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'Catastrophic loss' Husband of Deirdre Morley calls for 'inclusive investigation' into her mental health treatment before she killed their 'beloved' children

Mr McGinley said he was “no closer to understanding why” his children died

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Andrew McGinley with children Conor, Darragh and Carla

Andrew McGinley with children Conor, Darragh and Carla

Andrew McGinley with children Conor, Darragh and Carla

The husband of Deirdre Morley has called for an investigation into the former nurse’s treatment by the HSE mental health services before she killed their three children.

Ms Morley was found not guilty by way of insanity of the murders of Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley by a jury in the Central Criminal Court today.

In a statement this evening, her husband Andrew McGinley described it as “probably the right verdict”.

Mr McGinley said he was “no closer to understanding why” his children died and called for an “inclusive investigation into Deirdre’s diagnosis, treatment and medication prior to this tragedy”.

This will help their family understand “the insanity that took the lives of our beloved Conor, Darragh and Carla,” Mr McGinley said.

“Deirdre’s diagnosis prior to the children’s deaths is different to her diagnosis now. With the cooperation of the HSE Mental Health Services I hope we will be able to understand why as the HSE Mental Health Services were responsible for Deirdre’s diagnosis, treatment and medication and she was in their professional care,” Mr McGinley said.

Everyone who knew Deirdre, “knows how much she loved our children and how devoted she was to them,” Andrew said, asking for the investigation to be conducted as a matter of urgency.

“If Deirdre’s diagnosis was questionable prior to January 24, 2020, then surely so too was her treatment and medication. We are now also aware of a number of occasions within Deirdre’s professional care when her initial diagnosis should have been queried but none of these seem to have been fully addressed,” Mr McGinley said.

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Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley. Pics from Twitter - Conor’s Clips ,

Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley. Pics from Twitter - Conor’s Clips ,

Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley. Pics from Twitter - Conor’s Clips ,

Andrew said the trial was never going to explore those issues, so he asked the HSE Mental Health Services for an inclusive investigation.

“This will help us understand the insanity that took the lives of our beloved Conor, Darragh and Carla”.

“We as a family need to be included in any investigation as our exclusion during her treatment has left us with many unanswered questions. We believe that an inclusive investigation can only serve to inform clinicians in their practice and therefore avoid tragedies like ours happening again.

“We do not want any other family to suffer as we have,” Andrew said.

Mr McGinley claimed the Mental Health Act of 2001 doesn’t go far enough in ensuring family support structures for the patient are fully engaged and included by the mental health professionals treating loved ones.

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Deirdre Morley with husband Andrew McGinley and children Conor, Darragh and Carla.

Deirdre Morley with husband Andrew McGinley and children Conor, Darragh and Carla.

Deirdre Morley with husband Andrew McGinley and children Conor, Darragh and Carla.

“This was raised by Una Butler back in 2010 following the deaths of her beautiful daughters Ella and Zoe. She campaigned tirelessly to many within the Oireachtas to seek a more inclusive and collaborative approach with families. Alas nothing much changed.

“The lessons which should have been learned from the sad loss of Ella and Zoe should have led to improvements in the Mental Health Act. This in turn would have prevented the deaths of Conor, Darragh and Carla in our opinion.

“It is too late for us but I do not want to see another grieving parent speaking in the future about the same exclusion after a similar catastrophic loss,” Mr McGinley said.

In response to queries this evening, the HSE said it could not comment on individual cases as “to do so would breach our duty of confidentiality to the individuals concerned.

"Maintaining confidentiality is not only an ethical requirement for the HSE, it is also a legal requirement as defined in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) along with the Data Protection Acts 1998-2018,” the health service said.

“In the event of a serious incident the HSE responds as part of a coordinated inter agency response team. Depending on the nature of the incident this can involve other relevant organisations such as the Gardai, Tusla etc.

“While the confidentiality of service users must be maintained the HSE regularly meets with family members and carers to share information that might be deemed to be beneficial to the treatment and ongoing recovery of service users.

“If Mr McGinley would like to speak to a member of Mental Health Services the HSE would be happy to arrange this."

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