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'Tense situation' Ex Inner City Helping Homeless chairman says Anthony Flynn blamed him for suspension

Mr Hall said he went to the gardaí over concerns about the safety of himself and his family.

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Former chair of the ICHH David Hall

Former chair of the ICHH David Hall

Former chair of the ICHH David Hall

David Hall, the former chairman of Inner City Helping Homeless (ICHH) has said his former boss, the late Anthony Flynn, blamed him for his suspension.

Speaking on the The Hard Shoulder on Newstalk, Mr Hall explained why he stood down as chairperson.

“I stood down because I was having great difficulty getting into the premises, tensions were high, people were upset understandably after Anthony took his own life and many people blamed me, and Anthony prior to his passing away blamed me for suspending him.

“That unfortunately left a very tense and difficult situation for me. Conversations were being had in relation to my safety and communication was being given to the charity about that and I had no choice but to protect myself and my family and in a tense situation step back,” he said.

Mr Hall said he went to the gardaí over concerns about the safety of himself and his family.

The Office for the Director of Corporate Enforcement has been put on notice that the charity plans to apply to the High Court to appoint an inspector to review their operations.

Mr Hall expressed on social media his views on the charity regulatory system, he described it as “utterly useless”. He said change is needed to protect good charities.

He has compiled a report detailing the nature of allegations made against Anthony Flynn, the former boss of ICHH.

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The late Anthony Flynn. Photo: Gareth Chaney

The late Anthony Flynn. Photo: Gareth Chaney

The late Anthony Flynn. Photo: Gareth Chaney

“When you get circumstances where controversies arise within a charity then public confidence diminishes, some charities who are providing vital and important services have challenges providing those services and there’s a risk to those services.

You also have good charities that get damaged by this, the public stop making donations and an ongoing saga gets dragged out much longer than it should be,” he said.

Mr Hall said trustees in a similar situation to him need help and guidance in such circumstances, he said, “none of which is available from the regulator”.

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He added: “When a situation arises, I believe the public has an expectation that the charity regulator will act appropriately to take action to protect the charitable purpose, the cause, the staff and where there’s money, the money in the charity and also to protect the entire sector from ongoing erosion of confidence from the public in charities.”

“To manage to provide services and engage with people of the most vulnerable nature, from mental health issues to social exclusion, from disabilities to various forms of abuse, to have people willy-nilly with the greatest intention in the world, go and give those people a sandwich at nighttime and engage them, that’s not good enough,” he said.

Mr Hall believes if an organisation is unable to provide the support that service users require, then the regulator should intervene and help the charity.

“These people deserve the respect that anybody else deserves to have trained and certified staff. I’m not saying you exclude people from that, you bring people and organisations along and you provide them with training and support,” he said.

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