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conviction challenge Killers Tom and Molly Martens unlikely to get retrial moved, says prosecutor

The father and daughter are hoping to be released from prison in North Carolina by April 2 after winning a challenge to their conviction for the second-degree murder of Limerick father-of-two Jason Corbett (39).

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Jason Corbett and Molly Martens on their wedding day (Inset above: Molly Martens' photo taken after arrest; inset below: Molly Martens' father Tom)

Jason Corbett and Molly Martens on their wedding day (Inset above: Molly Martens' photo taken after arrest; inset below: Molly Martens' father Tom)

Jason Corbett and Molly Martens on their wedding day (Inset above: Molly Martens' photo taken after arrest; inset below: Molly Martens' father Tom)

US prosecutors have warned any attempt by killers Tom and Molly Martens to have their proposed retrial transferred is likely to fail.

The father and daughter are hoping to be released from prison in North Carolina by April 2 after winning a challenge to their conviction for the second-degree murder of Limerick father-of-two Jason Corbett (39).

A retrial was ordered by a wafer-thin four to three ruling of judges on the North Carolina Supreme Court.

Davidson County district attorney Garry Frank will consider a potential retrial once he receives the written judgment mandate from the supreme court in 10 days.

However, Mr Frank said he believes any retrial will again be held in Davidson County where Mr Corbett worked - despite speculation the defence legal teams will seek a transfer to another part of the US state.

A member of the Martens family has also hinted that a plea may be offered to a lesser charge given that the duo have already served almost four years in prison.

Tom Martens (71), a retired FBI agent, and his daughter, Molly (37), who travelled to Ireland to work as a nanny for the Limerick widower's two children, were sentenced to 20 to 25 years in prison after being convicted in 2017 of Mr Corbett's murder.

He was found beaten to death in the bedroom of his home on August 2, 2015.

He had been attacked with a concrete paving brick and a metal baseball bat.

Mr Frank said any transfer of a retrial out of Davidson County is extremely unlikely.

"You have to basically show that you cannot pick a fair jury. That is usually a very difficult hurdle to pass," he added.

Mr Frank said he will now take some time to evaluate the supreme court judgment.

The Corbett family have vowed they will do everything to support the process to deliver a second murder conviction for the two killers.

Mr Frank also said he is confident a second conviction can be secured in the event of a retrial.


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