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Ferry strange 'Ghost boat' carrying €65 million of cocaine washes up on remote Pacific island

Police in the paradise island had their biggest ever bust drop into their laps

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Marshall Islands Police Captain Eric Jorban empties packages of cocaine into an incinerator

Marshall Islands Police Captain Eric Jorban empties packages of cocaine into an incinerator

Marshall Islands Police Captain Eric Jorban empties packages of cocaine into an incinerator

A 'ghost boat' carrying 649kg of cocaine worth an estimated €65 million has washed up in the Marshall Islands.

The massive haul of cocaine was discovered hidden in an abandoned fiberglass vessel on a beach at Ailuk Atoll, located between the Philippines and Hawaii.

Police in the paradise island had their biggest ever bust drop into their laps after the 5.5 metre boat washed ashore last week with 649 kg (1,430lb ) of cocaine hidden in a compartment beneath the deck.

Attorney general Richard Hickson said the vessel most likely drifted across the Pacific from Central or South America.

“It could have been drifting for a year or two,” he said.

Drugs often wash ashore on the remote Pacific archipelago, but last week's discovery set a new record.

The cocaine came sealed and wrapped in blocks, according to police, who then collected and destroyed most of the packages by burning them in an incinerator.

Photos of the blocks show stained, yellowing plastic, stamped with a red logo that bears the letters "KW."

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Marshall Islands police transport the confiscated packages of cocaine to an incinerator

Marshall Islands police transport the confiscated packages of cocaine to an incinerator

Marshall Islands police transport the confiscated packages of cocaine to an incinerator

Law enforcement officials have put forward a number of different theories about the find, including that they were abandoned when smugglers were in danger of being caught, or lost in storms.

In January 2014, Salvadoran fisherman José Alvarenga washed up in the Marshalls, more than 13 months after he set off from Mexico’s west coast with a companion, who died during the voyage.

Mr Hickson praised locals for notifying authorities about the most recent haul as sometimes drugs that wash up are sold rather than reported.

Police said the drugs were incinerated on Tuesday, apart from two packets, which have been sent to the US Drug Enforcement Administration for testing.

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