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meth in his madness US man arrested after massive bag of meth spotted in his Facebook Marketplace ad listing

The Sheriff said Kertz now has 'a new place to stay' after his arrest

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Kertz failed to realise a massive bag of crystal meth was visible in his ad listing for a catalytic converter.

Kertz failed to realise a massive bag of crystal meth was visible in his ad listing for a catalytic converter.

Kertz failed to realise a massive bag of crystal meth was visible in his ad listing for a catalytic converter.

A US man has been arrested after accidentally posting a picture on Facebook Marketplace of a catalytic converter he was trying to sell with a massive bag of meth visible in the background.

Beside the bag of drugs, other drugs paraphernalia is visible, including a syringe with the needle resting on an upturned spoon on a table behind the emissions device.

38-year-old James Kertz who posted the ad, who has previous convictions for resisting arrest, endangering the welfare of a child, possession of a controlled substance and domestic assault, was taken into custody in the area of Reed Springs, Missouri, after it appeared on the social media trading platform.

When the cops raided Kertz’s home they found 48 grams of meth and an illegal handgun.

Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said the department had received a tip-off from a member of the public who noticed the bag containing the white substance.

He said: “Apparently he (Kertz) must have been under the influence because in the background of his picture he posted, he left his large bag of meth and syringe on the coffee table.

"Take note, if you are selling items on social media, make sure your drugs are not in the background!"

Rader added: "We have now provided him a new place to stay. Sorry folks, his catalytic converters are not for sale right now.”

Kertz was detained in Stone County prison following the search and has been refused bond.

A catalytic converter is a device put on cars to control exhaust emissions.

They contain precious metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium.

The converters are commonly cut out of cars by thieves in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland who sell them to criminal experts who can smelt the devices down in order to obtain the high value metals from them.

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