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Garda probe Two young boys rushed to hospital after ingesting cannabis jellies at Dublin hostel

Senior sources say that gardai are satisfied that the cannabis did not belong to the children’s parents but to another resident of the hostel.

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Gardai have consistently warned of the dangers of cannabis “jellies” and other similar products.

Gardai have consistently warned of the dangers of cannabis “jellies” and other similar products.

Gardai have consistently warned of the dangers of cannabis “jellies” and other similar products.

Two small children were rushed to hospital after apparently eating cannabis jellies in a terrifying incident that occurred in north Dublin this morning.

The two boys, aged three and four, were brought to Temple Street Hospital when an ambulance was called to a homeless hostel.

Senior sources say that gardai are satisfied that the cannabis did not belong to the children’s parents but to another resident of the hostel.

It is understood that they may have consumed the jellies at around 5am and then began displaying symptoms of drowsiness before the four-year-old started to lose consciousness.

The emergency services were alerted and the two little boys were rushed to hospital where they remain this afternoon.

It is understood that neither has suffered any significant medical complication. “They will be okay Thank God,” said a source.

The case is being investigated by Coolock gardai and no arrests have been made.

Gardai are today working with Forensic Science Ireland to determine the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content within jellies seized at the scene.

“A number of people at the hostel have been interviewed,” a senior source said.

A Garda spokesperson said in a statement:

"Gardaí are investigating reports of two young children who consumed jellies, possibly containing cannabis component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), at a premises in the Coolock area overnight between 11/05/2021 - 12/05/2021. Emergency services attended the scene and the children, males aged 3 and 4 years, have been taken to Temple Street Children's Hospital where they continue to receive medical attention.

"No arrests have been made at this stage. A person, not related to the children, is assisting Gardaí in Coolock with their enquiries," the statement added.

Gardai have consistently warned of the dangers of cannabis “jellies” and other similar products.

Last month, gardai urged parents to be aware of cannabis sweets which are sweeping the market, packaged to look almost identical to known brands of popular jellies.

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Meath gardaí said they seized a sizable quantity of the illegal sweets, some laced with dangerous levels of the psychoactive chemical THC.

The brightly luminous packets look just like they are aimed for kids but usually consist of a 500mg dose of THC.

In Meath, the sweets were seized in packets almost identical to well-known sweets leading to fears that a young child would easily be tempted to unwittingly take one.

In recent weeks The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) issued a warning after a number of recent incidents where edible products containing significant levels of the psychotropic cannabis component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were seized by An Garda Síochána and Revenue’s Customs Service.

The illegal sweets are currently sweeping the market and are packaged to look almost identical to known brands of popular jellies.

Last August, a leading addiction counsellor described a Garda drug seizure in Cork of cannabis jellies alongside a quantity of cocaine as “extremely worrying”.

Cuan Mhuire expert Michael Guerin was speaking after the seizure of almost €94,000 worth of cannabis products in Limerick and just over €2,000 worth of cannabis products, including jellies and vaping oils, in Cork city.

“Now we have the packaging of these cannabis products as a marketing ploy on behalf of the sellers to make them more attractive to young adolescents,” he said.

“It’s clear that these jellies and vaping oils are being distributed as an attempt to get more youngsters into recreational drug use. It’s as simple as that,” he said.

“There are synthetic substances, opiates and stimulants that are lethal at minute doses and which may be either deliberately laced with, or accidentally contaminated with deadly products. And the consequences can be catastrophic,” he added.

In October Limerick Chief Superintendent Gerard Roche said cannabis jellies were a worrying trend.

“We regard the use of cannabis juices and jellies as a very serious trend because they are designed really to trap and to encourage people – particularly young teenagers – to take drugs, particularly cannabis and make them really harmless looking along the lines of the alcopops from an alcohol point of view,” he said.

“We have issued warnings about it, people can take one of two of them (jellies) and they overdose so it is a trend that we are concerned about across the country,” he added.



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