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NO ID Tipperary premises warned not to sell alcohol to minors following garda sting

A spokesperson for An Garda Síochána in Tipperary issued a reminder that “the sale of alcohol to a young person under 18 is an offence and it is also an offence for anyone to buy alcohol for them.”

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Mayor of the Borough District of Sligo, Rosaleen O’Grady, called for a crackdown on online alcohol deliveries who fail to verify the ages of customers. (Philip Toscano/PA)

Mayor of the Borough District of Sligo, Rosaleen O’Grady, called for a crackdown on online alcohol deliveries who fail to verify the ages of customers. (Philip Toscano/PA)

Mayor of the Borough District of Sligo, Rosaleen O’Grady, called for a crackdown on online alcohol deliveries who fail to verify the ages of customers. (Philip Toscano/PA)

A number of premises in Tipperary have been reprimanded for selling alcohol to minors.

Gardaí in Cahir, Co. Tipperary led an operation into the sale of alcohol to young people under the age of 18 this week.

They found that out of ten locations visited, seven carried out a sale to a underage buyer and some neglected to ask for sufficient identification.

A spokesperson for An Garda Síochána in Tipperary issued a reminder that “the sale of alcohol to a young person under 18 is an offence and it is also an offence for anyone to buy alcohol for them.”

They have warned that the Community Policing Unit in Cahir will continue to carry out these operations.

This comes after the Mayor of the Borough District of Sligo, Rosaleen O’Grady, called for a crackdown on online alcohol deliveries who fail to verify the ages of customers.

Cllr O’Grady said: “We are particularly worried that unregulated after-hours drink delivery services, which are advertised online, are increasing in popularity.

“It is impossible for a retailer to accurately verify the age of a purchaser, online or over the phone, creating opportunities for those underage to source alcohol.

“Currently, the law requires that alcohol must be paid for before it leaves the licensed premises, therefore creating difficulties for the person doing the delivery to withhold alcohol if the purchaser is intoxicated or is under 18.

“At a grass roots level we are aware that unlicensed after-hours drink delivery services continue to sell alcohol without fear of regulation or detection.

“At the moment, they are breaking the law if they are delivering alcohol and taking payment on delivery. Basically, that's selling alcohol without a licence.”

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