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'free the lads' TikTok video shows mobile phone attached to copper tube thrown over Irish prison wall

"We have seen an increase in the number of 'throw overs' - contacts on the outside attempting to throw mobile phones and drugs into exercise yards"

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The clip shows the phone attached to a piece of copper tubing

The clip shows the phone attached to a piece of copper tubing

The clip shows the phone attached to a piece of copper tubing

A video has emerged on TikTok showing how tiny mobile phones are sellotaped to copper tubes before being thrown over Irish prison walls to inmates on the inside

Entitled ‘Free the Lads’ the clip shows the preparation of the device which those on the outside are using to get phones to criminals.

The clip records how the tiny phone is affixed to a length of copper tubing.

A hooded figure is then seen running along the side of what looks like Mountjoy Prison in Dublin, before the device is launched over the wall.

This unique method allows the tube to slip through the holes in nets that are often strung over the outside areas of Irish prisons that are used to stop contraband getting into the hands of prisoners.

The phone depicted in the video is a Long CZ, often referred to as a ‘Beat the Boss’ phone.

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The tiny devices are often referred to as 'Beat the Boss' phones

The tiny devices are often referred to as 'Beat the Boss' phones

The tiny devices are often referred to as 'Beat the Boss' phones

Weighing approximately 18g and no larger than an average adult’s thumb, the tiny device is often illegally smuggled into prisons.

‘Beat the Boss’ is so-called as it is designed to outwit the ‘Boss’, or body orifice security scanner, used by prisons when admitting a prisoner.

In November 2021, we revealed how the number of drugs and phones seized inside prisons had risen to new record levels as organised crime gangs targetted jails with ever bigger consignments.

The 1,338 phones seized that year marked an increase from the previous year's total of 1,251 and was almost double the number seized in 2016.

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The figures released by the Irish Prison Service after a request from the Sunday World showed how the growing number of seizures reflected the success of tighter security at prisons.

The month before saw one of the largest ever caches of drugs found in Mountjoy Prison which included an estimated 14,000 LSD tabs along with quantities of cocaine, heroin and several hundred tablets.

Also found in the search were 15 mobile phones, including smart phones and miniature mobiles which are easily concealed.

One man was also found to have three mini-mobile phones along with 800 tranquilliser tablets hidden internally.

The contraband had been sealed in three Kinder eggs and wrapped in a condom, according to Sunday World sources.

As attempts to deliver drugs by drone had dropped off due to several arrests and the replacement of windows in some prison cells around the country, so-called 'throw-overs' where small-time criminals threw drugs into exercise yards became the preferred choice.

A previous story in The Sunday World had showed how Kinahan-linked thugs such as Trevor Byrne have access to mobile phones despite being incarcerated.

He was filmed celebrating a birthday with other cartel-linked criminals including Kevin Gibson, Graham Gardiner, Glen Thompson and Robert Browne.

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The device is then thrown over the wall

The device is then thrown over the wall

The device is then thrown over the wall

A spokesperson for the Irish Prison Service told us at the time that the prevention of contraband being accessed in prison was "a high priority".

"The suspension of visits for significant periods since March 2020, as a result of Covid-19, has forced a shift in the methods used for trafficking contraband into prisons,” a spokesperson said.

"We have seen an increase in the number of 'throw overs' - contacts on the outside attempting to throw mobile phones and drugs into exercise yards.

"Due to the regimes currently in operation in our prisons, prison staff have been able to identify and intercept many of these 'throw-overs' ensuring they do not reach the prison population."

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