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chilling threats Thug who threatened to cut prison officer's throat comes from a terrifying criminal family

"I can't get you in here, but I can get you on the way home. I'll cut the throat of you," Luke Wilson told the prison officer.

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Luke Wilson

Luke Wilson

Luke Wilson

This young thug, who threatened to cut a prison officer's throat and those of his children, is no ordinary criminal.

The week before he made the bone-chilling threats, Luke Wilson (25) had been handed down a 11-year sentence for conspiring to kill a man on behalf of the Kinahan cartel.

During that trial it emerged he idolised his uncles John, Eric and Keith Wilson, feared as ruthless guns-for-hire in the underworld, who had helped raise their nephew.

"I can't get you in here, but I can get you on the way home. I'll cut the throat of you," Luke Wilson told the prison officer.

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John Wilson

John Wilson

John Wilson

With such criminal pedigree the officer had no choice but to consider the threat as being very serious, and told gardai.

At Dublin Circuit Criminal Court this week Wilson was given an additional two years for the threats to the 11 years he is already serving.

Despite his young age, he had arrived in prison with a reputation thanks to his fearsome uncles.

Eric 'Lucky' Wilson, who is serving 23 years for gunning down a man in Spain, was linked to a dozen gangland killings.

Lucky's brother, Keith, is serving life for the murder of hitman-for-hire Daniel Gaynor, shot dead in front of his family in Finglas in August, 2010.

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 Keith Wilson

Keith Wilson

Keith Wilson

It's believed at the time the Wilsons had been engaged in a feud with the Real IRA, led by brothers Alan and Vincent Ryan, who have both since been shot dead.

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A third brother, John Wilson, was murdered in an underworld hit in Ballyfermot, west Dublin, in 2012.

The 35-year-old was shot dead in front of his seven-year-old daughter in the doorway of his home by Keith O'Neill, who was later jailed for life.

O'Neill never saw the promised €40,000 for carrying out the hit and no motive for the fatal shooting emerged during the trial.

Nephew Luke showed he has inherited the family ruthlessness when caught on a surveillance tape talking about how he would kill Kinahan target Gary Hanley whether he was holding a baby or not.

He's heard on the tape snorting cocaine and planning how he would shoot Hanley over the strains of John Lennon's peace tune Let It Be, which is playing on the radio.

"Baby or no baby. I don't give a ****," he said.

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Gary Hanley. Photo: Sunday World

Gary Hanley. Photo: Sunday World

Gary Hanley. Photo: Sunday World

Luke's cousin Alan Wilson, who has been jailed for his part in the same plot to kill Hanley, is the nephew of infamous criminal Martin 'the General' Cahill, who was shot dead by the IRA in the 1990s.

The prison officer threatened by Luke Wilson told gardai the threat was made with real venom and he was concerned about it.

He said he had never seen that level of aggression from Wilson before and knew he had contacts in the criminal world and was capable of carrying out these threats.

Prison Officers' Association assistant general secretary, Jim Mitchell, welcomed the fact the threats had been taken seriously by the gardai and the courts.

"It is a reflection of the type of stuff prison officers have to put up with on a daily basis.

"We welcome any kind of sentencing on something like this. It is, for a change, an acknowledgement of the difficult job that we do. This is a daily thing, it's not just a one-off," he said.

Mr Mitchell said prison officers often become "acclimatised" to abuse and threats.

"It's a testament to the courts that this was recognised as above and beyond what the norm is. The reality is we get abuse all the time."

When Wilson was just 18 his close pal Patrick McCann shot him three times.

As he lay on the ground, the gun jammed and Wilson survived his horrific injuries which left him blind in one eye.

McCann had been drawn into the murder plot over a €300 drug debt in what the trial judge Paul Carney at the time compared to a plot line from the TV drama Love/Hate.

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