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Drugs supermarket Residents under siege from dealers in Dublin flats where Daniel Kinahan grew up

Local councillor Mannix Flynn hit out at the Council, saying they have failed families living in the complex.

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Olive Bond flats

Olive Bond flats

Olive Bond flats

Crack cocaine dealers are running an open drugs supermarket in the flat complex where mob boss Daniel Kinahan grew up.

Last week a Sunday World investigation shows how cartel drug dealers are openly selling crack cocaine in the inner-city complex where the mafia boss was raised in scenes akin to The Wire.

Our undercover team watched as Kinahan product was sold like sweets in a shop with residents living in terror of the designer-clad pushers who have taken over the courtyards and stairwells.

The dealing is happening just metres from the flat where Kinahan's mother, Jean Boylan, lived and which is still kept as a "shrine" to her - seven years after she died.

Local councillor Mannix Flynn hit out at the Council, saying they have failed families living in the complex which has become an estate of fear.

"Dublin City Council are the landlord here and they have allowed criminal gangs run Oliver Bond. The place is run by the dealers and it is as simple as that.

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Mannix Flynn blasted the council

Mannix Flynn blasted the council

Mannix Flynn blasted the council

"Residents are terrified and they have been abandoned by everyone. People are queuing up to get a transfer. Parents can't even send their children to the shops as they are afraid that they will be targeted by the dealers. Grown men are terrified. People stay in and close their doors and they don't let their children out," he said.

As our photographs show, Oliver Bond is like a set from a gangland drama rather than a real-life situation that greets children there every day. Drug addicts walk like zombies on the streets outside but they don't have far to go before they get exactly what they want.

In the courtyards, Kinahan street dealers man the stairwells with menace and threaten anyone who challenges their authority.

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A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

Dressed in Canada Goose jackets, designer shades and Balenciaga runners, they open for business from 8am and work through the day and night. Up to 30 street dealers can be operating at any one time.

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Coke, crack, benzos, weed, hippy crack and heroin are all for sale in the 'Bond', which is under 16 CCTV cameras monitored by Dublin City Council.

Crack pipes, tin foil and syringes litter the ground and the pavements outside while a new generation of children grow up in the shadow of the mob.

At the heart of the complex is the ground floor flat where Jean Boylan raised the Kinahan brothers and later watched as Daniel outdid his father, 'Dapper Don' Christy Kinahan Snr, to become a billion euro mob boss and Ireland's most wanted criminal.

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Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex, Dublin.

Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex, Dublin.

Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex, Dublin.

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Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex

Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex

Drug paraphernalia discarded near the Oliver Bond flats complex

Seven years since her death the flat is still in the tenancy of her partner Harry Mallon and daughter Sinead Mallon.

Criminal Assets Bureau officers entered the property in recent months and discovered that it is being kept as a virtual shrine to the former cleaner, who had relocated to Spain herself before her death.

Nothing of value was seized from the flat,

Flynn says that the Council has abandoned Oliver Bond, which sits on the banks of the River Liffey and which was the scene of a shocking rave party during the second wave of the Covid pandemic last year.

Taoiseach Micheal Martin visited the complex and met with community activists after footage of the massive Saturday night party went viral and reports of open drug dealing on the night shocked a scared public.

Visiting the site, Martin acknowledged the problems faced by residents of the area and said that more Government investment was needed to regenerate the complex, but no further developments have occurred.

Oliver Bond has long sat at the centre of a gangland ground zero in Dublin 8, the area from where the Kinahan Organised Crime Group emerged. Key Kinahan lieutenants including Spanish-based Bernard Clancy, hitman James Quinn and arsonist Davin Flynn all once called the flats home.

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The Oliver Bond flat complex in Dublin.

The Oliver Bond flat complex in Dublin.

The Oliver Bond flat complex in Dublin.

When he was arrested and later charged with the murder of Gary Hutch, Quinn had a dog-eared picture of Jean Boylan in his wallet.

She was the first wife of Christy Kinahan Snr but the couple split when their boys were small and they moved between both parents. At one point they lived with their father in Tallaght, but later lived with her in the flats complex.

The tenancy of the flat passed to her second partner, Harry Mallon, when she died in 2014.

The couple had a daughter together, who is a half sister of the Kinahan brothers, but officers believe that she spends a lot of time in Spain for almost a decade. Nobody was at the flat when CAB officers searched it.

Jean Boylan had moved to Spain herself in the years before she died but returned to Dublin when she was diagnosed with cancer.

Her sons returned to the city for her funeral in May 2014 and sent an army of young lieutenants out to patrol the area around Oliver Bond, while mourners came to sympathise with them at the flat. At the time of the funeral graffiti was daubed on a nearby church accusing Gary Hutch of being a 'rat'.

In the years since, the refurbished flat has remained untouched and exactly as she had left it. The property is regularly cleaned. The Bureau began investigations after receiving confidential information about it.

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Daniel Kinahan’s product is ending up in his former flat complex.

Daniel Kinahan’s product is ending up in his former flat complex.

Daniel Kinahan’s product is ending up in his former flat complex.

Residents at Oliver Bond are terrified of speaking out against Kinahan and his gang. During the course of our investigation, the Sunday World communicated through encrypted networks in order to guarantee anonymity to those who live there.

"For security reasons no one is willing to talk but this problem is out of hand," a source said.

"The amount of crack cocaine and heroin being sold is phenomenal. It is an epidemic. It is like residents are living back in the 1980s, it is that bad. Children have to witness drug dealers selling crack and heroin every time they go out. The dealers start at 8am and work until late into the night."

Drug dealer Greg Lynch has been running the drug sales at the complex. Despite surviving a shooting which was sanctioned by Daniel Kinahan, he still wholesales their product into his childhood home despite remaining in the background.

Lynch's uncle Gerard 'Hatchet' Kavanagh had been supplying him from the Spanish Costa before he was murdered by the mob in a bar in 2015. Lynch is understood to have bought directly from the Kinahan organisation after the murder.

One source said: "How many lives can these few people destroy so they can continue to get rich? It is so frustrating. They are literally selling crack cocaine to women who are pushing babies in their buggies.

"There can be up to 25 or 30 gang members operating at any one time in the complex, selling this poison. The decent residents are trying to rear their children and give them a chance in life but how can they with what is going on?"

It is understood that Dublin City Council has been repeatedly informed about drug dealing in the area, as has Kevin Street Garda Station.

"The people feel that nobody cares and how could they think any different? We are losing generations of kids to this blight. It's not only Oliver Bond, it's in other Dublin City Council complexes too.

"They are the landlord with a huge budget of over one billion in State funds. They have private security on their offices. Why shouldn't the people be entitled to the same level of protections from their landlord?"

"DCC is finalising its application for the first phase of regeneration of Oliver Bond House to the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage," the statement said.

"We have initiated a programme of short term works including: environmental works, painting of common areas, regularising parking and provision of centralised and secured bin enclosures. Further work is planned with regards to improving the play facilities in the complex.

"Work will commence on a number of elements of this programme when Level 5 restrictions are removed."

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