| 14.1°C Dublin

Drug pandemic Oliver Bond residents need a 24-hour garda presence and 'feel abandoned' by the state, says leading criminologist

Most of the residents are salt of the earth, the heart of Dublin. But they have had a lot of false dawns. Only recently the Taoiseach Michael Martin committed to regeneration but you can be sure that little if nothing has been done”

Close

Criminologist Trina O’Connor

Criminologist Trina O’Connor

Criminologist Trina O’Connor

Leading criminologist Trina O’Connor has said that a constant community garda presence is needed for the Oliver Bond flat complex to rebuild trust with residents who feel abandoned by the state.

O’Connor who is a community activist says the shocking pictures of open drug dealing at the south inner-city flats where Daniel Kinahan grew up is akin to scenes from the 1980s heroin pandemic in Dublin.

She says a multi-pronged approach is needed to take control back from the Kinahan street dealers who are intimidating locals and terrifying young children.

Close

Drug dealing in the Oliver Bond flats complex

Drug dealing in the Oliver Bond flats complex

Drug dealing in the Oliver Bond flats complex

“Oliver Bond is one of the oldest and largest complexes in Dublin. It was built in 1936 by a famous architect and is a protected structure. But it is also a community, a vibrant community and a small number of people, usually from outside the area, are coming in and causing a lot of this anti social behaviour like drug dealing.

“Most of the residents are salt of the earth, the heart of Dublin. But they have had a lot of false dawns. Only recently the Taoiseach Michael Martin committed to regeneration but you can be sure that little if nothing has been done. And the people feel abandoned with a small number of run people running their estate. The negative impact that has on their lives and those of their children cannot be underestimated. Can you imaging how upsetting it is for children who want to go into their playground to find a young guy there selling drugs.

“The affects are very traumatic for people seeing drug dealing on their doorstep. That trauma results in damages to mental health and self esteem. People are stigmatised by the label as being from flats and that all has negative connotations.”


Close

A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

A drug user holding a crack pipe near the flats

On a Crime World extra podcast Trina says that we cannot ignore the intimidation that residents are living under.

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

“ We need as a society to take responsibility. We need community garda in there. It is very, very wrong that we have residents in social housing feeling abandoned. But that isn’t enough. We cannot police our way out of this. We deed to do something in a joined up way and react with a public health response and help to build some scaffolding around children growing up there.

“The levels of dealing going on really do feel like we are back to the 1980s but of course the big difference is the levels of violence that exist now compared to then. Back then violence was threatened but it was a last response. Now it can be the first. People are afraid of even speaking out and who could blame them. We saw what happened in the north east inner city. Neighbours were spying on neighbours and families that went back decades turned on one another. The Kinahan Hutch feud really changed the landscape when it came to intimidation of people within these communities.”

Trina O’Connor is interviewed for a new Crime World Extra podcast available now on all platforms.

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Top Videos





Privacy