'scarred for life' | 

Nadine Lott’s killer Daniel Murtagh has his face ‘sliced open’ in savage prison assault

“Murtagh is an inmate who rubs people up the wrong way and it looks like it finally came back on him,” a source said.

Daniel Murtagh. File photo

Nadine Lott

Nadine Lott

Patrick O'Connell and Eamon DillonSunday World

Evil killer Daniel Murtagh – who battered his innocent ex-girlfriend Nadine Lott to death – has had his face sliced open in a brutal jailhouse attack.

Sources say the vicious killer is likely to be scarred for life after the attack on the B1 landing in the Midlands Prison during which ‘he was sliced open from his temple down to his chin.’

“The incident kicked off on the B1 landing at approximately 5pm today,” a source told the Sunday World.

“Murtagh is an inmate who rubs people up the wrong and it looks like it finally came back on him.

“The lad who attacked him opened him up from his temple all the way down to his chin.

“Murtagh was losing a lot of blood by the time staff got to him and he had to be rushed to Portlaoise Hospital.

“Despite the best efforts of staff, he lost a serious amount of blood and he’s still over there under guard tonight.

“He’ll carry the scars of what happened today for the rest of his life.”

The source said an inmate who carried out the attack was immediately restrained by prison officers.

He has been segregated from the other inmates and is now facing stiff disciplinary proceedings known as a ‘P19’ behind bars.

The matter is also being referred to gardai.

A spokesperson for the Irish Prison Service said he could not comment on cases involving individual prisoners.

The inmate and another suspect behind the savage attack at the Midlands Prison are two relatively minor criminals with a reputation for violence, it was added.

The attack is thought be an attempt by the suspects to establish themselves as “top dogs” in the prison inmate hierarchy.

Kinahan Cartel gunman Gary Thompson, described as a pal of Murtagh’s, was also beaten up by the same pair a number of weeks ago, said sources.

Nadine Lott

Finglas man Thompson is serving 12-and-a-half years for his role in a plot to kill Gerry ‘The Monk’ Hutch’s brother Patrick ‘Patsy’ Hutch.

Both Murtagh and Thompson have been moved to different prisons since starting their sentences.

Thompson had previously been moved out of Mountjoy Prison where he was suspected to be exerting control over other inmates and the drugs trade behind bars.

In Murtagh's case the moves were made amid threats to his safety from other inmates.

Brute Murtagh (36) of Melrose Grove, Bawnogue, Clondalkin is serving a life sentence for the murder of his 30-year-old ex-girlfriend Nadine.

The attack happened on December 14th, 2019 at mum-of-one Nadine’s apartment in St Mary’s Court, Arklow.

He beat the 30-year-old Nadine Lott, mother of his daughter, so badly she was barely recognisable.

Nadine died three days later, on December 17, in St Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin.

Murtagh admitted manslaughter but denied murder and last July launched an appeal against his conviction.

An eyewitness, Nadine’s neighbour, told the trial that Murtagh made a “growling noise” and was “vicious with rage” as he inflicted blows on his ex-partner in her living room “like a wild animal”.

Amela Kulenovic found the defendant “in a crouched position” on top of Nadine with his hands around her neck and shoulders.

She said he was “going ape on” his former partner and was “totally out of control”.

Evidence was also given that a garda, one of the first responders on the scene, who phoned ambulance control informed them that Nadine had been “beaten to a pulp”.

Garda Linda Butler said the left side of Nadine’s face was “extremely and grotesquely swollen” and when she placed her fingers inside the patient’s mouth to clear her airways, she noticed some teeth were missing.

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A paramedic who attended to the mother-of-one in her home testified that the scene he witnessed in Nadine’s house would “haunt” him for the rest of his career and was one of the most “horrendous” he had ever walked into.

Ian Clarke said it was like a “bulldozer” had gone through her apartment and described kneeling on broken glass as he performed CPR on her.

An intensive care nurse at the hospital described Nadine as “completely unrecognisable” and said she had never seen anybody so badly injured.

“Her mum brought in a photo of her and everyone kept saying ‘who is that’ and I said: ‘that’s her’,” Leah Grant said.

The trial heard Nadine died after suffering “traumatic head, neck and chest injuries” and her brain was swollen following the “sustained and violent attack”.

Chief State Pathologist Dr Linda Mulligan noted that the blunt force injuries were caused by hands, fists or feet and that the use of a blunt weapon could not be ruled out.

The court heard there were 64 individual injuries observed all over Nadine’s body which could not be accounted for through medical intervention.

Murtagh’s counsel had sought a manslaughter verdict in the case, arguing that the “bloodbath” would never have happened “but for the drink and drugs” Murtagh had consumed on the night.

Nadine Lott

The accused told gardaí that before assaulting Ms Lott he smoked a joint, took two pills and drank a shoulder of Captain Morgan rum straight.

He also said he had been on methadone for the previous three months.

Instead, the jury accepted the State’s case that Ms Lott’s death was a case of murder and “nothing short of murder”.

At Murtagh’s sentencing hearing, Nadine’s mother Claire told the Central Criminal Court that her family are “haunted” by thoughts of her daughter's “terror, fear, panic and cries” during the “prolonged, evil attack” carried out a man she described as a “monster”.

Referring to the two-week trial, Mrs Lott said that her family had been “dragged” through it, which has “added fresh grief and new nightmares to the memories we carry every day”.

“We now have even more detail, evidence and pictures of the extreme gravity of Nadine's suffering. The callous, coldness and unremorseful evil that forced our beautiful Nadine from us, her family,” she said.

In her statement, Mrs Lott said the staff at St Vincent's Hospital had “tried so hard” and “went above and beyond”, with “many visibly emotional at what they were seeing and dealing with”.

“For people who witness a lot in their daily roles this was testament to the monstrosity and evil Nadine had endured in her final hours," she added.

Nadine died three days later on December 17th, which Mrs Lott described as a “nightmare” which “had no ending”.

Imposing a life sentence, Mr Justice Michael MacGrath called the murder of Nadine “brutal” and said that the evidence from gardaí and first responders who attended the scene in the aftermath of the attack, some who remain greatly upset, was “testament to the terror, evil and brutality” that the deceased was subjected to.


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