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SMOKE KING Murdered Gerry Hutch associate Noel 'Kingsize' Duggan left estate valued at just €91k

The 55-year-old, described by gardaí after his murder as 'an ordinary decent criminal' was shot dead by a cartel hit-team outside his home in 2016

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Noel Duggan left an estate valued at just €91,000.

Noel Duggan left an estate valued at just €91,000.

Noel Duggan left an estate valued at just €91,000.

Murdered cigarette smuggler Noel 'Kingsize' Duggan died - leaving an estate in Ireland valued at just €91,000.

The 55-year-old, described by gardaí after his murder as 'an ordinary decent criminal' was shot dead by a cartel hit-team outside his home on the Fairyhouse, Road in Ratoath on March 23, 2016.

A soft target, Duggan is believed to have been killed due to his close friendship with Gerry Hutch while his own criminality was considered by gardaí to have been almost exclusively linked to the smuggling of cigarettes.

He was not believed to have been involved in the drugs trade and, while he lost his life in a gun attack, he had never been linked with gun crime or armed feuds.

Although Duggan was believed to have earned vast sums of money from his lucrative cigarette smuggling activities, probate documents obtained by the Sunday World show much of this money had been either lost to him or moved to Spain by the time of his death.

Duggan's will, which went to probate on August 20, shows a pre-tax value to his estate of €95,721.

According to the probate documents, "it is hereby acknowledged by the Revenue Commissioners that the gross value of all the estate of the said deceased within this jurisdiction, amounts to €95,721. The net value thereof amounts to €91,439."

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Gerry ‘The Monk’ Hutch and Noel Duggan.

Gerry ‘The Monk’ Hutch and Noel Duggan.

Gerry ‘The Monk’ Hutch and Noel Duggan.

 

In Duggan's last will and testament, which he signed on September 15 2010, he stipulated that he was revoking "all former wills and other testamentary dispositions - save for my Spanish will dated February 12, 2004."

This means that at the time of writing his Irish will, Duggan had dealt with his Spanish assets separately and these were not included in the estate covered by his Irish will.

Duggan had three adult children, two boys and one girl.

His will stipulated that his estate was to be bequeathed to his wife, and in the event she predeceased him, it was to be divided evenly between his three children.

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Duggan grew up on Carnlough Road in Cabra, North Dublin and he became a close friend of Gerry 'The Monk' Hutch at an early age.

The pair remained friendly all their lives and it was this friendship that gardaí suspect led to his fatal shooting in Ratoath.

During the '80s, Duggan was involved in low-level crime, including burglaries and handling stolen goods.

However, even in his younger days, he generally opted for a hands-off approach to crime.

"In the mid-1980s, carjackings and joyriding were big back then in Cabra," a source said at the time of his death.

"But Duggan was too cute to get involved in anything like that."

For several years, he operated a thriving cash-and-carry business on Queen Street near Smithfield in Dublin's north inner-city, which he used as a cover for his smuggling operation.

He made a fortune from Ireland's illegal cigarette trade and was regarded by gardaí as the biggest single wholesaler of illicit tobacco in the'90s.

Gardaí believe he sourced his tobacco in Africa and used a sophisticated smuggling network to land it in Dublin.

His racket in smuggled cigarettes was so big that the retailers' representative group RGDATA complained to the government that their members were losing huge amounts of revenue as a result.

In 1996, a Garda operation - Operation Nicotine - was launched to target Duggan's multi-million pound business.

He was targeted by the Criminal Assets Bureau and served with a tax assessment of €4m.

He was eventually forced to hand over the keys of several inner-city properties to CAB, which were auctioned off to pay a final settlement of €2m.

In 2003, CAB confiscated a five-storey apartment and retail block Eagle House in the heart of Dublin's Smithfield which was owned by him and another.

After this he attempted to rebrand himself as an honest businessman.

However, gardaí believe he remained heavily involved in the illegal cigarette trade and worked with ex-Provos based in the border area.

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