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EXPOSED Ireland's most violent prisoner Celyn Eadon back on the streets after serving ten years

Addict who stabbed his mother to death in frenzied attack gets huge escort from prison

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Celyn Eadon pictured in Dublin after his release from prison.

Celyn Eadon pictured in Dublin after his release from prison.

Celyn Eadon pictured in Dublin after his release from prison.

This is the man known as Ireland's most violent prison inmate back on the streets after being freed, having served his time for killing his mother in a frenzied knife attack.

Celyn Eadon was seen walking in Dublin this week hours after being released from the Midlands Prison where he was held in the National Violence Reduction Unit.

Fears of his danger to the public meant he was taken from the prison by an escort of five officers and driven to an address in Dublin, according to sources.

Newly freed prisoners usually walk out the gate to be collected by family of friends, or get public transport home.

Eadon (29) was taken to an apartment to start his new life on the outside, but is being closely monitored by gardai in a bid to protect the public.

The Sunday World understand that a nationwide bulletin had been issued to all gardai ahead of his release. Officers were warned to exercise caution if in contact with Eadon. who is considered volatile and highly dangerous.

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Celyn Eadon had his murder conviction overturned.

Celyn Eadon had his murder conviction overturned.

Celyn Eadon had his murder conviction overturned.

 

 

This included information on how to deal with him and warning that Eadon feels threatened if he thinks he is not being taken seriously or being listened to.

Eadon has been constantly disruptive and violent since going behind bars in 2011 after killing his mother Noreen when he was 19. He stabbed her 19 times at their Co. Mayo home when she burned his drugs stash.

During his time inside, Eadon had been subject to what is known as 'barrier-handling', in which he was escorted by control and restraint teams wearing body protection and helmets any time he had to leave his cell.

Initially jailed for life for the murder of his mother, in 2019 Eadon won a Supreme Court appeal against the conviction and earlier this year pleaded guilty to manslaughter charge for which he got a 14-year sentence.

At his trial this year, his defence lawyer said it was "utterly apparent" that Eadon had acquired a brain injury from his consumption of drugs as a juvenile.

He said "gross intoxication" was not an excuse for his actions but it had deprived him of an intention to kill and cause serious injury to his mother.

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A victim impact statement prepared by Mark Eadon, Noreen's former husband and Eadon's father, was heard in court in which he said that his wife had lost her life trying to protect her child.

"I do not blame Celyn for what happened any more," he said. "I'm sure, had she survived, she would have forgiven him."

Both the prosecution and defence expressed concern about where Eadon would live on his release. The Probation Service previously said it was unable to provide the type of high-support accommodation he needed.

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Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

 

Details of Eadon's disturbed and violent behaviour while in prison emerged during various court hearings as he notched up more convictions.

He carried out 15 assaults, including ten on prison staff. Even while in court, Eadon could be abusive and during one video-link hearing he called a prosecution barrister, a "f**ing annoying b**tard" and a "f***ing a**hole" before the link was cut.

At his manslaughter trial earlier this year he repeatedly asked the judge: "When's my release date?"

Sentencing judge Mr Justice Michael White said Eadon "remains at risk of inflicting violence on the public" and his violent temperament is an "alarming factor".

He imposed a number of conditions relating to the two-year suspended part of the sentence that a high priority be given to Eadon's "structural release".

Eadon's most recent conviction came last May when he appeared in Portlaoise District Court where he told the judge he launched an attack on jail staff because "all the prison officers were annoying me".

He hit a prison officer in the back of the head, despite being handcuffed at the time, in an unprovoked attack at the Midlands Prison.

Judge Catherine Staines imposed a four-month sentence for the assault which happened in September 2020 at the prison.

He also got a two-and-a-half-year jail term for throwing boiling water at another prison officer in Mountjoy.

In another incident, Eadon attacked a worker in Wheatfield and caused injuries to his arm and shoulders, and attacked prison officers while being brought from his cell to another part of the prison.

He was one of the first prisoners sent to the specialist National Violence Reduction Unit in Portlaoise.

Noreen Kelly's partner, Michael Kelly. told an inquest hearing into her death in 2018 that Eadon could have been in custody when she was killed.

He described it as "a miscarriage of justice", explaining that three weeks before the 2011 killing, Noreen had accompanied her son to court where he was charged with failing to appear.

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Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

Eadon on the streets after serving his time for killing his mother.

 

The judge sentenced Eadon to ten days in prison and ordered that a psychiatric evaluation be carried out, he said. However, he walked free from the court and was not arrested until after his mother's death.

During his murder trial in 2014, it was heard how Eadon had started taking drugs at an early age, beginning with solvent sniffing at the age of 10.

By the time of his mother's death he was taking amphetamines, methamphetamines and cannabis along with prescription medication.

The court was told Ms Kelly had taken drugs from her son's bedroom and burnt them the evening before she died.

Various witnesses told the trial that Eadon was hallucinating in the days before killing his mother, seeing aliens, fire ants, demons and black smoke.

His mother had tried in vain to get help for him from both the gardai and the local hospital, it was heard in court.

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