| 8.6°C Dublin

Not ready for this jelly Gardai warn of dangers of eating 'cannabis jellies' after Dublin raid

We regard the use of cannabis juices and jellies as a very serious trend because they are designed really to trap and to encourage people – particularly young teenagers – to take drugs"

Close

There appeared to be products that would be considered to be jellies or sweets that contain cannabis.

There appeared to be products that would be considered to be jellies or sweets that contain cannabis.

There appeared to be products that would be considered to be jellies or sweets that contain cannabis.

Gardai have again warned of the dangers of cannabis “jellies” and other similar products, following a drugs raid in South Dublin. 

Members from the DMR East Burglary Response Unit (BRU) carried out a search on a premises on December 18 where they seized approximately €30,000 worth of cannabis and cocaine, plus €3,000 in cash.

A number of illegal weapons were also seized in the raid that followed an investigation into the sale of illegal drugs in Sallynoggin and surrounding areas.

One male was arrested, detained, charged and later bailed to Dun Laoghaire District Court.

A picture of the haul posted online shows several products that would be considered to be jellies or sweets that contain cannabis.

Close

The haul

The haul

The haul

Following a number of seizures around the country in recent months, serious warnings were issued in relation to these products.

In August, a leading addiction counsellor described a Garda drug seizure in Cork of cannabis jellies alongside a quantity of cocaine as “extremely worrying”.

Cuan Mhuire expert Michael Guerin was speaking after the seizure of almost €94,000 worth of cannabis products in Limerick and just over €2,000 worth of cannabis products, including jellies and vaping oils, in Cork city.

“Now we have the packaging of these cannabis products as a marketing ploy on behalf of the sellers to make them more attractive to young adolescents.

“It’s clear that these jellies and vaping oils are being distributed as an attempt to get more youngsters into recreational drug use. It’s as simple as that,” he said.

“There are synthetic substances, opiates and stimulants that are lethal at minute doses and which may be either deliberately laced with, or accidentally contaminated with deadly products. And the consequences can be catastrophic.”

In October Limerick Chief Superintendent Gerard Roche said cannabis jellies were a worrying trend.

“We regard the use of cannabis juices and jellies as a very serious trend because they are designed really to trap and to encourage people – particularly young teenagers – to take drugs, particularly cannabis and make them really harmless looking along the lines of the alcopops from an alcohol point of view,” he said.

“We have issued warnings about it, people can take one of two of them (jellies) and they overdose so it is a trend that we are concerned about across the country,” he added.

This week, gardai said they, alongside Revenue and Customs, have made a number of seizures of cannabis ‘jellies’ and similar products during 2020.

“These products are generally ordered online, but they are illegal under the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2017,” a Garda spokesperson said.

“When discovered An Garda Síochána will send the items to Forensic Science Ireland where the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content within the jellies is analysed and determined.

“Any person suspect of the importation of such items is subject to prosecution by An Garda Síochána and potential criminal conviction.”

The spokesperson added: “These particular products are designed to look harmless and inviting, particularly to younger persons, however the ingestion of a substance(s) with an unknown THC content can have significant detrimental health impact on an individual and both immediate and long term.”

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices

Online Editors


Privacy