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roadside shooting Gangster Caolan Smyth took lie detector test to prove he was not involved in the killing of Sean Little

In 2019, Smyth went to the UK to take the polygraph and posted the results along with a photograph of himself back to associates of Little (22), who was found dead beside a burning car in Balbriggan that summer.

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Gucci gangster Caolan Smyth took a lie detector test in order to prove he had nothing to do with the shooting of his pal Sean Little

Gucci gangster Caolan Smyth took a lie detector test in order to prove he had nothing to do with the shooting of his pal Sean Little

Caolan Smyth

Caolan Smyth

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Gucci gangster Caolan Smyth took a lie detector test in order to prove he had nothing to do with the shooting of his pal Sean Little

Gucci gangster Caolan Smyth took a lie detector test in order to prove he had nothing to do with the shooting of his pal Sean Little as he ran scared that he’d be killed in revenge for the roadside shooting.

But associates of Little remain convinced that Smyth set up his friend as a €200,000 debt to the Kinahan Cartel.

Little's murder turned Coolock into a warzone and resulted in a number of killings over a murderous period.

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James ‘Mago’ Gately

James ‘Mago’ Gately

James ‘Mago’ Gately

In 2019, Smyth went to the UK to take the polygraph and posted the results along with a photograph of himself back to associates of Little (22), who was found dead beside a burning car in Balbriggan that summer.

He insisted that he was innocent and had nothing to do with the gangland double cross that saw Little lured to a meeting on the isolated roadway before he was killed.

Days later Iranian Hamid Sanambar was shot dead as he went to the family home to pay his respects and officers believe he was wrongly blamed for setting up the young drug dealer.

Little’s father Stephen Little, 46, was subsequently arrested with a firearm and told gardai: "Had you given me another hour, I would have killed that bastard that killed him."

He pleaded guilty to the gun charge and has been sentenced to six years in prison.

Smyth was never arrested or charged in connection to Little's murder.

Gately was shot just weeks after another Kinahan plot to kill him was foiled when international hitman Imre Arakas was arrested in Dublin with his address in Newry in his possession.

However, today, Smyth was found guilty of the attempted murder of James ‘Mago’ Gately, a key Kinahan target, who was injured at a Topaz Garage in north Dublin in May 2017.

Would-be hitman Smyth shot Gately five times but didn’t kill him. The Special Criminal Court heard that he put him under surveillance the day before and the morning of the shooting.

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Caolan Smyth

Caolan Smyth

Caolan Smyth

Smyth is a close associate of the Finglas-based drug dealer Mr Flashy and was central to the shocking events in the Finglas and Coolock area in 2019 which first saw Zach Parker, 21, gunned down, then his pal Little and finally Iranian Sanambar, 42 in a wave of violence.

He was friends with Little and even attended the scene of his murder in Walshestown along with the victim’s distraught father and the Iranian.

Sanambar had been the subject of much controversy in the underworld and Gucci gang associates had claimed he had been sent by Daniel Kinahan to Ireland to finish off the Hutch gang.

They claimed that he had fought in Iran and Syria and that he was an expert in beheadings and other methods of torture which have sickened the West.

He wore two tear drop tattoos on his face – suggesting he had either been involved in murders or that he was seeking the revenge for two murders.

Instead, he was an asylum seeker who has been involved in low level criminality in Ireland for years. He had arrived in the country more than five years previous and was once arrested in a brothel and charged with robbing a laptop and cash.

He had lived initially in Cork where he had been involved in petty crime, but Gardai had established that Sanambar had started to be collated with the Gucci gang a year before his death.

It was all part of an attempt by the Gucci Gang to strike fear in rivals that they were ‘Cartel’ and they had even worn the ‘Kinahan colours’ to the funeral of Parker when he was shot the previous January, despite the fact that no senior members of the mob attended.

Instead of having protection from the Kinahan group, it is understood that a drug debt to them lay at the heart of the tensions.

Gardai believe that the debt which was held by murdered Sean Little kicked off a bloodbath.

Little, 22, owed the money for drugs but didn’t have it to pay back until he collected money owed to him from the so called Gucci gang.

Little had acted as a middle man between the Gucci Gang and the Cartel due to his relationship with a key member of Liam Byrne’s mob.

Parker had initially tried to collect the funds but when he was shot in outside a gym in Swords, Little was left to put the pressure on for the money so he could pay off his own overlords.

Senior officers believe that he was shot dead to cancel the debt owed to him by his former associates in the Gucci gang.

“They didn’t want to pay up. It is as simple as that. Sean Little needed the money to pay up the ranks to the Kinahans but he couldn’t get paid. They decided to take him out rather than pay him,” a senior source said.

Officers believe that Sanambar, who had worked as a driver for Little, was chosen as a pawn to blame because he had nobody to avenge his death and nobody to attempt to clear his name.

Complex double crosses and allegations surrounded the events and Smyth’s declarations of innocence but he was facing jail anyway after he was linked to the attempted shooting of Gately.

It is understood that he will need to be kept apart from a number of individuals within the prison system and is likely to be housed within the Kinahan population where up to 70 former mob members and hired hands are serving lengthy sentences.


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