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crime pays Footage shows mobster Daniel Kinahan paying $140k for signed football at charity auction

The host can be heard saying: "At $140,000…and you showed us that you’ve got massive balls…at $140,000..sold!"


THIS is the moment mobster Daniel Kinahan agreed to pay $140,000 for a signed Champions League Final football at a charity auction event in Kazakhstan in 2019.

The crime boss can seen grinning alongside MTK Global president Bob Yalen as he wins the auction bid while the host praises him for his “massive balls."

The footage comes from the same charity fundraising event where Kinahan was previously pictured with boxing promoter Bob Arum.

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Bob Arum and Daniel Kinahan (right)

Bob Arum and Daniel Kinahan (right)

Bob Arum and Daniel Kinahan (right)

It is believed to have been taken at the Annual Gala for the Snow Leopard Foundation in Astana Opera Nursultan on July 4, 2019.

In the clip, Kinahan can be seen sitting at a table while items are auctioned off for the charity.

After Kinahan successfully bids for a signed football used in the Champions League Final, the host can be heard saying: "At $140,000…and you showed us that you’ve got massive balls…at $140,000..sold!"

Although MTK Global have claimed Kinahan stepped back from the firm in 2017, he remains heavily involved with a number of their fighters, including Tyson Fury and others.

MTK boss Yalen also told the BBC Panorama expose ‘Boxing and the Mob’ that aired in February how he remains in regular contact with Kinahan.

Kinahan, who is described as an adviser within the sport, led talks on behalf of Tyson Fury last summer when an initial two-fight agreement was reached.

After Fury hailed Kinahan for getting that deal “over the line” the ensuing uproar forced the Dubliner to step away from the talks. Bob Arum, who co-promotes the Gypsy King with Frank Warren, stepped into his place.

Kinahan’s work with MTK Global and its fighters was again highlighted only recently as MMA star Darren Till praised them both after he was forced to withdraw from an upcoming UFC fight.

As part of a long social media post, Till said what Kinahan and MTK Global “do as a management” and “friendship is untold”.

Daniel Kinahan was previously described in a Criminal Assets Bureau (CAB) affidavit to the High Court as managing and controlling the day-to-day drug trafficking operations of the Kinahan gang.

According to evidence put forward by CAB before the High Court, he is one of two leaders of the Kinahan cartel and is based in Dubai.

Just last month, a Dublin TD said Kinhan’s ongoing links to the management firm showed how he continues to “sportswash his criminal reputation”.

Fine Gael’s Neale Richmond said: “Once again we see that Daniel Kinahan is clearly still involved with MTK and continuing to sportwash his criminal reputation.

“Every athlete, promoter, TV company and sponsor that engages with MTK need to think long and hard about the role of Daniel Kinahan, he hasn’t gone away."

He added: “Every effort must be made to ensure the poisonous influence of a man who has caused such horror in Dublin is no longer allowed in international sport be it MMA, boxing or football.”

in the wake of the devastating Panorama exposé, boxing promoter Eddie Hearn also expressed his frustration at the fresh wave of controversy swirling around the sport.

Hearn, who represents megastar Anthony Joshua, said the BBC documentary ‘Boxing and the Mob’ that revealed how suspected crime boss Daniel Kinahan is still involved in the sport had brought the story to a much bigger audience.

Hearn has reacted to the latest controversy, saying the reason “this has come around is because of the focus on the fact that Daniel Kinahan is Tyson Fury’s advisor”.

“And initially, when we had to make that fight we were instructed to do so via Daniel Kinahan. Not Frank Warren, not Bob Arum,” Hearn said. "Now, because of the furore that switched to Bob Arum.

“But now it’s obviously brought the story to a much bigger audience, thus the BBC Panorama story.

“The show we saw the other night didn’t tell the hardcore boxing audience anything different,” he added, “because that story’s been told.

“But what it did do was open that story up to a much wider audience, which is not good for boxing because that’s the wider audience I talk about that I’m trying to convince to bring into boxing.

“With boxing, it always feels like, not certain people, but people never quite want it to get there.

“So anything that represents boxing in a bad light is never good for the sport.”

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