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shocking Dad reveals sickening images of street assault after been beaten over the head 40 times with his own crutch

Victim blasts prison sentence after thug attacked him on way home from hospital

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Seamus Troy was victim of a serious assault and robbery as he was leaving hospital

Seamus Troy was victim of a serious assault and robbery as he was leaving hospital

Seamus Troy was victim of a serious assault and robbery as he was leaving hospital

A victim of a horror mugging who was beaten over the head 40 times with his own crutch and had three coins forced down his throat has blasted his attacker's jail sentence.

Former All-Ireland winner Seamus Troy today releases shocking images of the injuries inflicted upon him by thug Adam Sheehan, just hours after Seamus got out of hospital.

Sheehan was sentenced to three years and nine months in jail for the attack.

Now, Seamus (47) is calling for a radical overhaul of sentencing guidelines where unprovoked attacks leave victims with life altering injuries.

The courageous father-of-four, who has since been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), told the Sunday World he sustained a broken eye socket, broken nose, a broken bone in his neck and required 27 staples to the head after being viciously attacked just hours after he left Cork University Hospital following an operation.

Earlier this month, attacker Sheehan (26) was given a 'headline' jail sentence of five years in prison for the attack, but because he automatically qualifies for 25 per cent remission, his real sentence for the near fatal attack is just three years and nine months.

"The sentence is wrong," Seamus, who won All-Ireland minor and under-21 hurling medals with his native Tipperary in 1989 and 1991, told the Sunday World.

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Seamus shared with the Sunday World these shocking photos of the aftermath of the attack.

Seamus shared with the Sunday World these shocking photos of the aftermath of the attack.

Seamus shared with the Sunday World these shocking photos of the aftermath of the attack.

"It's not enough and I told the detective investigating my case that when he rang me after the case. He said he is going to contact the DPP to appeal the sentence.

"I have a letter from the detective who arrived first at the scene and it says when the guards arrived, they thought at first they were dealing with a murder scene because of the amount of blood I had lost.

"The injuries I suffered were horrific.

"He left me with a broken eye socket, a broken nose, 27 staples to the head, a broken bone in my neck and he put three coins in my mouth when he knelt on top of me and forced them into my stomach.

"He shouldn't even have been on the streets when he did this to me. There was a warrant out for his arrest when he attacked me but the guards couldn't find him."

Recalling the events of the day of the attack, Seamus said: "I had just left the hospital ... I'd been in having an operation.

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The aftermath of the attack

The aftermath of the attack

The aftermath of the attack

"I had gone and had a burger and then I got a taxi up to the bus station to get a bus back to Limerick and they told me to go around the back.

"But he followed me around and grabbed my bag. I said 'come back with my bag' and I went to ring 999. And then he did come back and he pushed me to the ground.

"He took my crutch and beat me with it. He hit me at least 40 times over the head.

"He kept beating me with it until the crutch broke. I remember I looked up at him and said: 'I have kids, please stop.'

"But he just said: 'I don't give a f**k what you have,' and he just kept beating me and beating me over the head and across the face.

"My eyes were closed for six weeks, I had a big lump on my neck and my nose was broken from it. I had to go back to hospital afterwards because of the coins he left lodged in my stomach.

"The doctors did an MRI in Cork and that had to be forwarded on to my doctor and he sent me straight to the hospital to have the coins removed."

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Adam Sheehan had been to a headshop before the attack

Adam Sheehan had been to a headshop before the attack

Adam Sheehan had been to a headshop before the attack

Appearing before Cork Circuit Court earlier this month, Sheehan, from Seamus Murphy Place in Mallow, pleaded guilty to robbing Seamus on Railway Lane, off Brian Boru Street in Cork city centre on May 20 last year.

Garda Padraig White told how gardai found Seamus lying on the ground covered in blood on Railway Lane before they spotted Sheehan with blood on his clothes nearby.

They arrested Sheehan, who was quite intoxicated, and brought him to Mayfield Garda station for questioning and he admitted mugging Seamus and stealing his phone, rucksack and €80 in cash.

Sheehan's barrister, Peter O'Flynn, said that his client had apologised for what he had done during an interview by gardai.

Mr O'Flynn said he was not offering it as an excuse but Sheehan had consumed a headshop drug called spice, thinking it was cannabis.

He said the drug was recognised as having psychotic effects on users.

He said while Sheehan had 20 previous convictions including for burglary and arson, he had no previous convictions for such violence and he believed it could be attributed to consuming spice.

Judge Seán Ó Donnabháin said it was an appalling offence where a vulnerable man just out of hospital was mugged in such a heartless fashion and beaten repeatedly with his own crutches.

He said that Sheehan's behaviour was clearly psychotic on the day and while he may have taken a drug which affected his mood, it did not excuse his behaviour in committing such a violent mugging.

"This was a merciless attack without compassion, necessity or purpose," he said. He sentenced Sheehan to seven years in jail but suspended the final two years of the prison term.

Asked about Sheehan's claim he had acted under the influence of psychotic drug, Seamus said: "I don't believe his excuses.

"What he said to me that day was he wanted money for vodka. And only for James Christie Dunne, who saw me being beaten and intervened, I believe he would have killed me.

"I have been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because of what he did to me.

"I'm still waiting for word from a clinic on an operation to fix the bone in my neck.

"This had a huge impact on my kids as well.

"I'm 47 and I have four children, Becky is 26, James is 24 Nicole is 21 and Karla is 14.

"James, when he came to the hospital, said 'that's not my father' when the nurse pointed me out. My own son couldn't recognise me.

Arson

"This has caused me unreal damage in my life and that's being honest about it. I can't drive my car - and I don't like to leave the house.

"My son comes out to me to bring me for a drive and I won't go. And that's the PTSD, the feeling of non-stop anxiety.

"Adam Sheehan was charged under section 14 of the Criminal Justice Theft and Fraud Act and it carries a sentence of 10 years.

"He got away with less than half of that.

"This is a man who has previous convictions for burglary, arson and possession of a knife.

"It's not right. The courts need to recognise the long term effects these attacks have on the people who are injured. The offence carried a sentence of 10 years - that's what he should have got."

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