| 4.8°C Dublin

'smishing' attack Soccer coach let scammers launder €3,000 in his account, court hears

Judge Bryan Smyth adjourned the case at Dublin District Court for a probation report, saying it was hard to believe the accused had been that "naive."

Close

Daniel Kearney had been promised €200 for the use of account

Daniel Kearney had been promised €200 for the use of account

Daniel Kearney had been promised €200 for the use of account

A soccer coach let scammers use his account to launder €3,000 that had been stolen from a bank customer in a "smishing" attack.

Daniel Kearney (21) gave his Revolut details to a fraudster he met on Snapchat, after being promised €200 in return.

Judge Bryan Smyth adjourned the case at Dublin District Court for a probation report, saying it was hard to believe the accused had been that "naive."

Mr Kearney, of Castle Riada Grove, Lucan, pleaded guilty to money laundering on July 12 last year.

Garda Sergeant Michelle Lynch said a smishing scam at Bank of Ireland was investigated after a customer got a text message about an unauthorised transaction on his account.

He clicked on a link in the text and entered his PIN. His account was accessed without his permission and €8,500 was transferred to the account of a 16-year-old.

Some €3,000 of this was transferred into Kearney's Revolut account and withdrawn at various ATMs.

Kearney was not involved in the withdrawal of the cash, or the organisation of the scam.

He was "not suspected to have been a ringleader of any sort", his defence said.

The accused had no previous convictions. He made a "very foolish decision to allow his account to be used", she said.

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

Mr Kearney did not receive any money in the end.

He was a building contractor and had done work for the Niall Mellon agency in Africa, the court heard. He was on Covid payment at the time of the offence.

Mr Kearney had played soccer at a high level and was now coaching.

"This activity is quite widespread and has been widely advertised in the media, it's hard to believe, given what I have been told, that he was a naive person," the judge said.

"It's hard to believe someone would allow their account to be used by somebody they didn't even know."

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Privacy