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Case latest Manslaughter trial hears that alleged victim was 'very abusive' towards accused

Ronan Byrne (31) is alleged to have fractured James Marren's leg with a bat during an altercation

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Ronan Byrne

Ronan Byrne

Ronan Byrne

A manslaughter trial has heard that the alleged victim was “very abusive” towards the accused man and seemed to always blame him for things.

Ronan Byrne (31) is alleged to have fractured James Marren's leg with a bat during an altercation. A jury has heard that days after the man's leg was put in a cast at a hospital, a blood clot developed in his leg which travelled to his heart and this clot proved fatal.

Byrne, of Lohunda Downs, Clonsilla, Blanchardstown, Dublin, has pleaded not guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to the unlawful killing of Mr Marren (57) at that address on October 31, 2013.

He also denies production of a baseball bat during a dispute and assault of James Marren causing him harm at the same address five days earlier on October 26, 2013.

The court heard the defendant's mother, Mairead Byrne, and Mr Marren had been in a relationship for at least 13 years.

On the sixth day of the trial on Thursday, Philipp Rahn BL, prosecuting, formally closed the prosecution case before the jury.

In a statement which was read into evidence by Keith Spencer BL, defending, Philipp Marren said he was the son of the deceased man and had not seen his father in four years at the time of his death.

Mr Marren said when he turned 18, he made up his mind not to see his father anymore because he was fed up with him. He said his father was drinking heavily and was “very abusive” towards his partner and her sons.

He said when he was younger, he would spend weekends with his father, either at the house in Lohunda Downs or at a house in Sligo. He said he first met Mairead Byrne and her sons when he was around eight years old.

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Ronan Byrne

Ronan Byrne

Ronan Byrne

Mr Marren said his father was always drinking and would often hit Mairead and her sons. He said he would hit the accused man more so than the other lads and he seemed to always blame Mr Byrne for things.

He said he recalled one night he heard his father saying Mr Byrne had taken the inhalers of his brothers. He said his father barged into the bedroom, jumped onto Mr Byrne's bed, hit him and dragged him out of the room where he could hear his father continuing to hit the accused.

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Mr Marren said his father would always apologise the next day and say he would not do it again, but he would always do it again. He said his father never hit him at all.

“He was always abusive towards them and that is why I did not see my Dad for the last four years,” Mr Marren concluded.

The trial continues before Judge Patricia Ryan and a jury.

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