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For trial Former developer, a solicitor and an accountant charged over alleged €268k property fraud

Philip Marley (49), Herbert Kilcline (59) and Matthew Murphy (49) are charged in connection with the submission of false deeds for the transfer of ownership of houses in Dublin

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Philip Marley

Philip Marley

Philip Marley

A former millionaire developer, a solicitor and an accountant have been sent for trial charged over an alleged €268,000 property registration fraud.

Philip Marley (49), Herbert Kilcline (59) and Matthew Murphy (49) are charged in connection with the submission of false deeds for the transfer of ownership of houses in Dublin.

They all had books of evidence served on them when they appeared in Dublin District Court.

The three were sent for trial to Dublin Circuit Criminal Court.

Mr Marley, a businessman from Rathbourne Court, Ashtown, Dublin is charged with two counts of theft, two of money laundering and four property registration offences. The charges relate to two houses, at Phibsborough Road, Dublin 7 and St Mary’s Road, D4, and the amounts total €268,125.

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Solicitor Herbert Kilcline. Photo: Collins

Solicitor Herbert Kilcline. Photo: Collins

Solicitor Herbert Kilcline. Photo: Collins

 

Mr Kilcline, a solicitor of Bessborough Parade, Rathmines, Dublin 6 is charged with money laundering and submitting false deeds to the Property Registration Authority stating that ownership of the same two houses had transferred from one business entity to a second firm.

Mr Murphy is accused of money laundering by handling or transferring crime proceeds totalling €268,125.

The offences are alleged to have happened between 2016 and 2018.

Mr Kilcline and Mr Murphy both appeared before Judge Marie Quirke.

A state solicitor said books of evidence were ready and were served.

The court heard the DPP was consenting to the accused being sent for trial to the next sittings of the circuit court, on a date in October.

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Judge Marie Quirke gave each accused the formal warning that they had 14 days to supply any alibi details to the prosecution. She ordered the prosecution to furnish the defence with copies of the accused’s garda interview videos.

The accused were sent forward on existing bail conditions. Mr Kilcline’s solicitor, Daniel Cahalane, applied for free legal aid, to cover both junior and senior counsel in the circuit court. He said it was a “very complex matter.”

A garda sergeant said there would be objections to legal aid as Mr Kilcline was in possession of a property that was rented out. The sergeant was not sure if there was rental income declared on the legal aid application.

Mr Cahalne said Mr Kilcline had already been granted legal aid in the district court. Mr Kilcline no longer practiced as a solicitor and the property was no longer rented out.

He had “no financial means,” Mr Cahalane said.

Judge Quirke granted legal aid to include one barrister but said it had to be vouched and the state could renew its objection if it wished.

Applying for legal aid for Mr Murphy, solicitor Damien Coffey also asked for two counsel to be assigned, based on “the complexity of the charges and the amount of money” involved.

Judge Quirke again certified for one counsel and said the defence could renew its application on a later date.

Mr Marley was the last of the three accused to have a book of evidence served, at a separate court sitting before Judge Brian O'Shea. He was also given the formal alibi warning before he was sent for trial on existing bail terms to the same date in the circuit court.

A legal aid application on his behalf was deferred.

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