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suspended sentence Dublin man who smuggled pills into Mountjoy was trying to help his inmate father, court hears

District Court heard Fowler realised it was foolish and “regretted it the minute he did it”.

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Kaide Fowler was caught with the sedative tablets when he went to visit his father in Mountjoy

Kaide Fowler was caught with the sedative tablets when he went to visit his father in Mountjoy

Kaide Fowler was caught with the sedative tablets when he went to visit his father in Mountjoy

A DUBLIN man who smuggled valium into jail was trying to help his inmate father who had been prescribed the pills but was refused them by prison authorities, a court heard.

Kaide Fowler (34) was caught with €50 worth of the sedative tablets when he went to visit his father in Mountjoy.

Dublin District Court heard Fowler realised it was foolish and “regretted it the minute he did it.”

The accused, from Deanstown Avenue, Finglas West pleaded guilty to bringing drugs into prison.

Judge Bryan Smyth gave him a six-month suspended sentence.

Garda Sergeant Michelle Lynch said gardai were called to the prison on December 16, 2019. Prison officers had detained Fowler in the search area after he was stopped with a number of tablets concealed on his person.

These were Diazepam with a value of €50. The court heard he had been bringing the tablets in to his father, who had been prescribed them.

Judge Smyth asked if there would not have been a link up between the prison authorities and the doctor on the outside.

Defence solicitor Yvonne Bambury said a decision had been made by the prison service that if someone was on benzodiazepines prior to going into custody “they would not give it to you in custody.”

The drug was considered a threat to security in the prison and they would not give it regardless of how long someone had been taking the tablets, she said.

Withdrawal could lead to epileptic attacks so instead the prison gave Epilim to prevent seizures, Ms Bambury said.

At the time, Fowler’s father had gone into custody and the accused “decided he was going to try to help his father.

In the search area, he realised he had been foolish and “regretted it the minute he did it.”

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“This wasn’t someone who was selling for profit or trying to make financial gain, this was a son whose father was ringing him in a distressed state,” Ms Bambury said.

The father now realised he “put his son in a terrible position,” Ms Bambury said.

He had been taking the medication after another son had died three years ago, the court heard.

The accused had previous convictions for offences including possession of drugs.

Judge Smyth said he believed a sentence was warranted but decided to suspend it for a year given the mitigation.

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