Style & ShowbizShowbiz

Yoko Ono planning return to music

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Yoko Ono planning return to music

Yoko Ono is plotting a return to music.

The 82-year-old artist-and-singer - the widow of the late Beatles star John Lennon - feels ready to record a new album, the first since 2013's 'Take Me to the Land of Hell'.

It will be her 16th solo album, but she has not revealed whether she'll record the LP with her son Sean Lennon, who she reformed the Plastic Ono Band with in 2009 and has made three albums with since.

In a Q&A with fans on her website ImaginePeace.com she was asked: "Are there any plans for a new album soon?"

To which she replied: "I am back thinking about those things. I'll let you know."

In recent weeks Yoko has been concentrating on her 'Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971' exhibition, which is running at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, which runs until September.

The peace activist could find inspiration for her new songs from the two books she is reading in her spare time about "male problems".

When asked what the last book she has read in the Q&A, she said: "While I've been busy working on the MOMA show, I've read two interesting books about male problems. One was written by a guy, and the other was written by a woman. The one: 'The Fragile Male' by Ben Greenstein has been written since he was a feminist, and read all feminist books - all of which were by women - there were no male-ness books, so he wrote one. Think that it was written with that emotion of anger. But it's very interesting.

"'The Male Brain' by Louann Brizendine is like she has written after a very good meditation. No anger. So nice to know the two sides. I've read a few more important books 'The Gluten Lie', 'The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up', and some books on stem-cells, etc. But what we now must know immediately is how to understand and cope with the human male race, I think. So I suggest you read those two books first. (sic)"

Yoko previously vowed to carry on making music until she is in her 90s because her creativity hasn't dimmed.

She said: "I'm glad I didn't die when I was 70. I haven't done enough even now. It's going to be fantastic. I don't have another 50 years so I'm getting more focused because I really want to hammer it in."