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Wayne Bridge lost wedding ring

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Wayne Bridge lost wedding ring

Wayne Bridge went into a panic after he thought he'd lost his wedding ring in a bug-infested swamp on 'I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!' earlier this week.

The retired football player dropped to his hands and knees and began scrambling around through the jungle dirt after he realised his golden jewel, which he was given by his wife Frankie Bridge when they got married two years ago, had fallen off his finger.

The 36-year-old sportsman initially feared the ring had slipped off while he was rummaging around in a green swamp to win the Dingo Dollar Challenge, which saw the royals - Ola Jordan, Adam Thomas, Sam Quek and Wayne - move gunge from the pool into two different buckets and then into a test tube, on Wednesday (23.11.16).

However, Wayne breathed a sigh of relief when his fellow royal contestant Sam, 28, found the ring on the floor of the shower area later that day while she was washing.

Wayne said: "I must have lost weight, it came off far too easily, that's scary."

The hunk has now asked producers to stash the wedding ring in a safe place in the studio until he leaves the infamous camp over the next coming weeks.

This year's series has been riddled with bad luck since it hit television screens two weeks ago, as not only has the camp been taken over by potentially life threatening spiders and snakes, but the show has also been heavily criticised by Australian natives, who believe the progamme is mocking them and their rituals.

Producers have now been forced to take witchetty grubs off the menu for the stomach-churning eating Bushtucker Trials to avoid offending the aboriginals any further.

Wildlife presenter Chris Packham and survival expert Ray Mears have accused the show of disrespecting Australian aboriginals who rely on witchetty grubs for food.

Ray told The Sun newspaper: "It's like someone coming to Britain and saying, 'Eating a roast potato, isn't that weird?' The witchetty grub that the aboriginal people depend upon is an important source of protein. It has a religious significance. For us to go and make fun of that is very disrespectful."