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Scooter Braun: 'We owe it to our kids to make America safer'

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Scooter Braun: 'We owe it to our kids to make America safer'

Scooter Braun feels he has a "responsibility" to make America a better place for the younger generation.

The talent manager, whose books include the likes of Justin Bieber and Carly Rae Jepsen, is one of countless stars who have spoken out about the shootings at Orlando gay club Pulse in the early hours of Sunday morning (12Jun16). With 49 people killed and many more injured after a gunman open fired in the facility, it has been dubbed the worst mass shooting in American history.

While thinking about his nation, Scooter - who welcomed a son last February (15) with wife Yael Cohen - called upon his fans to fight for the cause to control gun use in the United States.

Alongside an Instagram photo of the words 'WE CAN DO MORE', Scooter wrote a lengthy caption: "I'm not asking Americans to lose rights..I'm not asking everyone to turn in their guns. I'm asking my fellow Americans to acknowledge we need a system to protect our future and the freedoms we claim to hold so dear."

He continued to stress that gun control will add to citizens' freedom, not take it away, and that people's decisions should focus on the outcome for the next generation. Questioning how many more speeches and tragedies it will take until action begins, the music mogul stressed how important it is to make the country safer.

"We only get a certain amount of time on this earth and our responsibility is to our kids," he wrote. "How can we look our sons and daughters in the eye with all we have now seen and not try? Not try to better this world for THEM!? We are better than this. God bless America.. But God isn't going to change this... He gave us free choice. Let's choose to make a difference."

After this emotional post, the 34-year-old shared a picture of the poem First they came ..., by Pastor Martin Niemoller. The religious figure was a Protestant who opposed the Nazi regime during World War II, whose poem captured the coward nature of German intellectuals with lines like: "Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out - Because I was not a Jew."

"Our past has taught us many lessons... Let us not forget this one. #westandtogether (sic)"wrote Scooter.

- Cover Media