Style & ShowbizShowbiz

Sarah Jessica Parker dresses son in second-hand clothes

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Sarah Jessica Parker dresses son in second-hand clothes

Sarah Jessica Parker will only buy second-hand clothes for her son.

The American actress is best known for her role of Carrie Bradshaw on Sex and the City, where she was constantly attired in designer garments and beautiful stilettos.

However, when it comes to outfitting her son James Wilkie, Sarah rejects new clothes in favour of finding pre-owned pieces.

“I will only buy second-hand clothes for my son, James Wilkie,” she told The Edit. “The documentary The True Cost (which explores the impact of fashion on people and the planet) really changed me.”

Sarah adds that she finds it easy to buy pre-owned T-shirts and jumpers for the 14-year-old to wear, but admits finding trousers for a teenage boy can be a challenge.

“The one area I’ve had a hard time with is pants, but I buy used T-shirts and sweaters for him. Track pants are hard – boys rip them; I don’t know how to get around that,” she smiled.

Sarah didn’t comment on how she and her husband, actor Matthew Broderick, choose to dress their seven-year-old twin daughters, Tabitha and Marion.

But when it comes to her shoe line, SJP by Sarah Jessica Parker, the sartorial star never compromises on quality. Her latest collection, in collaboration with Net-a-Porter, offers up satin heels and flats in jewel tones and metallics, detailed with chic embellishments, sparkly closures and satin bows, with prices ranging from $355 (£285).

“I would love to be able to offer a woman a $69 (£55) pair of shoes, but those are never going to last her. The heels are going to break, and they’re going to be made under conditions that I would feel really lousy about,” she said.

Sarah also shared that her shoes are made in Tuscany, Italy by fourth and fifth generation shoemakers using sustainable and artisan techniques. And while she realises $395 is a lot of money for many, she isn’t willing to back down on her values to offer a cheaper product.

“Now, that isn’t accessible for a lot of people, that’s out of touch, but I couldn’t give them a $69 shoe that would break,” said Sarah.

- Cover Media