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Pamela Anderson wants New York's prisons to go vegan

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Pamela Anderson wants New York's prisons to go vegan

Pamela Anderson has offered to serve food in New York's prisons if they go vegan.

The former 'Baywatch' star has written a letter through PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) and her own Pamela Anderson Foundation to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo urging him to make the menus in the jails across the state meat-free in order to save money and improve the health of the inmates.

If he does, Pammie - who is a dedicated vegan and animal rights campaigner - will get in the kitchen and serve up the vegetarian food to all those incarcerated.

In the letter, she wrote: "I'm frequently in New York, and I've been following your admirable efforts to rehabilitate the state's inmates through education. I have a suggestion that dovetails nicely with your prison reform plans while also helping to resolve the state's budget crisis. Since New York has over 52,000 inmates, you could save almost $2 million a year and improve the health of the prisoners by switching to nutritious vegan meals in correctional facilities."

Pammie did the same thing when an Arizona jail dropped meat from its menu and she has vowed to make good on her promise for New York.

She added: "If New York follows Arizona's lead in switching to meat-free meals in jail, I'd be happy to inaugurate the program by helping cook lunch and serve it to the inmates."

Despite her efforts, Democratic politician Cuomo's office dismissed her vegan menu suggestion.

Spokesman Rich Azzopardi said: "We greatly respect the work that PETA does, but there's probably a better chance of me being in the Baywatch reboot."

The 48-year-old set up the Pamela Anderson Foundation in 2014 to champion the rights of humans and animals and help the environment.

Since Cuomo entered office in 2010 he has closed seven jails and New York State's prison population has fallen by about 20,000 inmates since 1999. He also has sought to raise the age of criminality to 18, instead of 16.

Last December, the state announced it would no longer serve 'The Loaf' - a mixture of foods packed into a meatloaf-esque brick - to inmates in solitary confinement as a form of discipline after the New York Civil Liberties Union and other prison-rights groups campaigned for reforms on the way prisoners are treated when housed away from the general population.