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Michelle Heaton fears daughter will carry cancer-causing gene

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Michelle Heaton fears daughter will carry cancer-causing gene

Michelle Heaton is worried her daughter could the cancer mutation gene BRCA2.

The former Liberty X star had a double mastectomy operation and hysterectomy after finding out she had the potentially deadly cancer-causing gene in 2012.

Now she worries her four-year-old daughter Faith could inherit the same abnormality from her and have to make the same tough decision as to whether or not to have the preventative surgery.

Speaking on TV show 'Loose Women', an emotional Michelle said: "I mean every time that I talk about this (I cry), or sometimes I'm out and about and women come up to me and sometimes they break down and they cry and then I cry and then we all cry. And Faith's like, 'Why did she come up to you? Why are you crying Mummy?' She's starting to get that something's happened because she knows I've had an effect on other people and they have an effect on me and it kind of hurts me because I don't know how it will affect her growing up because she'll suddenly realise that she could have it."

However, Michelle hopes that because of her own experience Faith - who she had with her husband Hugh Hanley - will have enough knowledge to help her make the right decisions should she discover she is a BRCA2 carrier in later life.

Michelle added: "Imagine having that decision aged 18, do I have a hysterectomy? At such a young age, to prevent what could possibly happen before even having children. I was lucky I had one child already so I was blissfully unaware almost. But then the other side of it is that hopefully Faith will be equipped with knowledge that many women [won't have]."

As soon as Michelle, 36, found out she had 80 per cent chance of developing breast cancer and a 30 per cent ovarian cancer she had the two operations, and then underwent breast reconstructive surgery.

Michelle's fears for her daughter comes after she revealed Faith has a 50 per cent chance of being a BRCA2 carrier.