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Lily Allen's husband has 'filed for divorce'

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Lily Allen's husband has 'filed for divorce'

Lily Allen's husband has reportedly filed for divorce.

The 'Smile' singer's marriage to Sam Cooper has appeared to be in difficulty for some time, with the building firm boss said to have moved out of their family home, and it has now been claimed he has filed legal documents to end their five-year union, citing infidelity as the reason for the breakdown of their relationship.

It was previously claimed Lily - who has two daughters, Ethel, four, and three-year-old Marnie, with Sam - had grown close to grime artist Skepta.

A source said of the divorce: "Lily and Sam were having problems for a while, but then Lily got close to Skepta, that was the final nail in the coffin."

Though the fling is said to have ended, Lily and Sam's split has divided friends and the 'Not Fair' singer is feeling "isolated".

The source told Grazia magazine: "Several of Lily's friends have sided with Sam, which has left her quite isolated from big parts of the group they once hung out with together."

But friends of the 30-year-old star are hoping the divorce means she can move on and make a fresh start.

The source added: "Lily has had a tough time recently. Now things with Sam are officially over, those around her hope she can start a fresh chapter."

The brunette beauty recently suggested divorce should be taught in schools.

When asked what would be the perfect Lily Allen curriculum, the singer replied: "An introduction to divorce! I don't know ... things that everybody needs to know about!"

She was then asked: "Is there something that you need to tell us Lily?"

To which the pop star responded: "The dangers of marriage. It's just life skills isn't it?"

Lily, 30, then moaned her time in school didn't prepare her for any of the real-life tasks and challenges everyone is faced with, such as "mortgages and self-assessment tax returns".

She said: "Why they don't discuss mortgages, self-assessment tax returns, or national insurance on the curriculum? Just to make the point that everyone has to deal with personal finance at some point in their life.

"I left education formal education at 15 ... but I've never been able to get my head around finances, I'm terrible at maths ... Everybody get themselves into all sorts of difficulties and end up having to spend extortionate amounts of money on accountants and lawyers to sort it out."