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Fraggle Rock returns to TV

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Fraggle Rock returns to TV

'Fraggle Rock' is returning to TV - 33 years after it premiered.

Jim Henson's children's show about a group of carefree creatures known as Fraggles who live in caves beneath a lighthouse was a huge hit in the 1980s and ran for 96 episodes and aired in 98 countries, winning five international Emmy Awards.

The original series has now been remastered and will return to its original home of HBO for a full run, the Jim Henson Company has announced.

A statement from the company revealed: "In remastering the series illuminate has created a contemporary look for the series with meticulous attention paid to every detail - sharpening the images, cleaning up the contrast, increasing the vibrancy of the colours and re-formatting for wide-screen - all under the careful supervision of Brian Henson (Jim's son)."

The Fraggles share their world with the tiny industrious Doozers who make buildings out of candy that the Fraggles eat and a family of Gorgs, fat furry creatures who hate the Fraggles because they 'steal' the radishes they grow.

The puppet programme was also famous for its musical elements, often featuring folk, blues, gospel, country and rock songs, while the show was popular with parents for promoting themes of friendship and tolerance and environmental respect.

A 'Fraggle Rock' movie is also in development with Joseph Gordon-Levitt starring as the lead character.

Joseph previously admitted the show 'Fraggle Rock' was one of his favourite ever shows and he is confident he and producer Lisa Henson - the CEO of The Jim Henson Company and the late puppeteer's daughter - can do the series and Jim proud.

In a statement, Joseph said: "The first screen personas I ever loved were Henson creations, first on 'Sesame Street', and then on 'Fraggle Rock'. Jim Henson's characters make you laugh and sing, but they're also layered, surprising, and wise. From Oscar the Grouch, to Yoda, to the Fraggles. I've never stopped loving his work, even as a young frisky man, and on into adulthood. Collaborating with Lisa Henson makes me confident we can do something that Jim would have loved."