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DNCE'S Cole Whittle says celebrity culture can be empty

ShowbizBy Sunday World
DNCE'S Cole Whittle says celebrity culture can be empty

DNCE's Cole Whittle thinks there is a difference between an "artist" and a "celebrity".

The dance/rock band's bassist believes being a creative person making art is the equivalent of being a "beautiful garden", whilst just being famous is comparable to being an "empty trash can".

Asked what separates the two, he said: "I think the difference between an 'artist' and a 'celebrity' is that some people are both, some people are neither, but I think it's an amazing yin and yang win when people find themselves being both. Being an artist that's being recognised at a level in pop culture in the universe for their art. So I think the difference can be like an empty trash can or a beautiful garden."

Cole and his bandmates - lead singer Joe Jonas, JinJoo Lee and Jack Lawless - were being interviewed as the cover stars of the new issue of Client magazine.

In the exclusive Q&A, the 'Cake By The Ocean' hitmakers also revealed they complete creative control over their music and what they release.

Former Jonas Brothers star Joe said: "[We have] 1000 per cent control. We control pretty much everything we come up with and we really get to collaborate and try to come up with fun ideas. When we're performing live, it's really fun for us to really let loose and come up with a full show that makes DNCE the best version of ourselves whether it's wild and crazy or it's a song that reminds us of our childhood, we try to showcase that on stage."

DNCE are about to release their self-titled debut album on November 18 and Joe says the writing process for the record was a collaborative one.

Joe, 27, said: "The writing process is different every time. There's moments where I've written songs by myself for this upcoming album, there's been times where we've all been in the same room and collaborated and it's been just one guitar chord or a bass line and it kind of grows and grows until we have something that feels like it's unique, and then we get into the studio and try to put it together."