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David Bowie's ashes to be scattered in mountains?

ShowbizBy Sunday World
David Bowie's ashes to be scattered in mountains?

David Bowie's ashes will reportedly be scattered in the Catskill Mountains.

The 'Velvet Goldmine' hitmaker was cremated shortly after he died of cancer last Sunday (10.01.16) and it has now been claimed his remains will be settled in the area of upstate New York - which is close to where the legendary Woodstock festival was held in 1969 - and only close family, including wife Iman and children Duncan and Alexandria, will know exactly where his final resting place will be.

A source told the Sun on Sunday newspaper: "After decades of frenetic city living, David finally found peace in the mountains and that's where I am sure some of his remains will go.

"David was very private in life and intended to remain so in death. But you can rest assured he told his family exactly where he wanted his ashes scattered."

It has been claimed David was inspired by his friend Freddie Mercury, who requested his ashes be scattered in secret to avoid a public monument and leave his work as his lasting legacy.

A source told the Sunday Mirror newspaper: "Like David's close friend Freddie, he decided he didn't want there to be a grave or memorial.

"He wants to be remembered for his life, not as a monument.

"For him the most important thing was maintaining the ongoing legacy of his work. He would hate for his life to be ¬immortalised by something like a headstone. It's just not who he was or what he was about.

"He was a man who liked to be in control of his life, his career and his legacy - so of course it makes sense that he has been in control of this too."

David's loved ones are also planning a private funeral service to say goodbye to the 'Sorrow' singer.

An official statement released earlier this week read: "The family of David Bowie is currently making arrangements for a private ceremony celebrating the memory of their beloved husband, father and friend.

"They ask once again that their privacy be respected at this most sensitive of times."