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Cliff Richard doesn't need Rod Stewart's help with legal bills

Cliff Richard doesn't need Rod Stewart's help with legal bills

Sir Cliff Richard has reassured Sir Rod Stewart he doesn't need his help in paying his legal fees.

The 'Devil Woman' hitmaker - who was subject to a 22-month long investigation after four sex abuse allegations were made against him during 1958 and 1983, before all allegations against him were eventually dropped - is planning to sue both the BBC and the South Yorkshire police for naming him as the suspect in the child abuse case, and for publicly broadcasting a raid on his Berkshire mansion in 2014.

And while he was touched when Rod recently vowed to pay half his legal costs in the suit, he has told his pal he is "loaded" and doesn't need the money.

Cliff, 76, told Britain's HELLO! magazine: "I was thrilled. It was a heart-driven speech and I loved it when he said he'd help out with the legal fees.

"Later I emailed him back, 'Don't worry, I'm loaded. I won't keep you to it.' "

The 'Do Ya Think I'm Sexy' hitmaker publicly backed Cliff earlier this month, saying he is standing with the star "one million percent".

Speaking on stage at the Pinktober Gala presented by Hard Rock Heals at the Dorchester Hotel in London, the 71-year-old rocker said: "Cliff, you were persecuted mate and we all know it. We are one million percent behind you. If you sue those b*****ds I'll give you half."

Cliff - who was never arrested or charged with any offence - previously admitted he felt he had been "hung out like 'live bait'".

Speaking in a statement about the claims made against him, the 'Summer Holiday' actor said: "[I was] named before I was even interviewed, and for me that was like being hung out like 'live bait'."

And the vocalist has admitted his life has been "turned upside down" since the unfortunate events.

Speaking previously, he said: "My life was effectively turned upside down and my reputation worldwide, was unnecessarily damaged. I would not want the same to happen to others whether in the public eye or not.

"Whilst the police of course need to properly investigate allegations made to them, it is clear to me that questions need to be answered by both the police and the BBC about their initial handling of my matter, which has rightly been condemned from so many quarters, including the Home Affairs Select Committee, the broader press, and, even the police themselves."