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Angelina Jolie not heading to Georgetown after all

ShowbizBy Sunday World
Angelina Jolie not heading to Georgetown after all

A Georgetown University representative has shot down reports suggesting Angelina Jolie is set to take her teaching talents to Washington, D.C.

The Salt star became a visiting professor at the London School of Economics (LSE) in May (16), when it was revealed she and former British Foreign Secretary William Hague would lecture for a new one-year master's course, Women, Peace and Security during the 2016/2017 academic year.

Last week (ends05Aug16), it was alleged Jolie would also be teaching a similar class at famed private college Georgetown, but students' hopes have since been dashed.

"We enjoy a partnership with the London School of Economics as part of that work, where Angelina Jolie and William Hague are scheduled to teach a class in the fall," university spokeswoman Rachel Pugh tells People.com.

However, she continues, "There are no current plans for Ms. Jolie to teach at Georgetown."

But that doesn't mean Georgetown educators wouldn't welcome the opportunity to have the Oscar winner and Hague join their team of staff in the future.

"Angelina Jolie and William Hague have an open invitation to share their experiences and perspectives at Georgetown anytime they're able," Pugh adds.

Jolie and Hague previously teamed up to launch the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative (PSVI) in 2012 in a bid to crack down on sexual attacks in war zones, and their ongoing work led them to stage the first Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict in 2014.

At the time of her LSE announcement, Jolie, a special envoy for the United Nations refugee agency, admitted she was excited to hear about the new course, which focuses on a subject the actress and humanitarian has been particularly passionate about.

"I am very encouraged by the creation of this master's programme. I hope other academic institutions will follow this example, as it is vital that we broaden the discussion on how to advance women's rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict," she previously said in a statement.

"I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations."

- Cover Media