Style & ShowbizHealth

Try this egg-cellent new weight-loss plan!

HealthBy Sunday World
Try this egg-cellent new weight-loss plan!

Scrambled, boiled, poached: nothing beats a good egg. And they're not only tasty; they're also a great weight-loss aid.

Past studies have found that eggs help shift those extra pounds, including research gathered by the Rochester Centre for Obesity in the US. 30 obese or overweight women ate either two eggs or a bagel for breakfast, with both meals containing around the same amount of protein and calories. However, the women who ate eggs stayed fuller for longer and ate less for lunch. Over the following 36 hours they consumed around 417 fewer calories than the bagel participants - a massive difference!

So starting your day with poached eggs on brown bread will not only banish your hunger pangs, but could really help you trim down.

With a hardboiled egg coming in at around 78 calories, you don't have to feel guilty about having one as a snack either. The recent craze is egg with spinach, so why not tuck into this as healthy and savoury elevenses.

Eggs are also packed full of zinc, iron, vitamins A, D, E and B12, which is impressive for such a small food!

It isn't just eggs which have been linked to weight loss though: a new study has found that drinking 16 ounces of water before meals plays a big part in getting slim.

Published in journal Obesity, the experiment went on for 12 weeks and monitored 84 adults. Everyone was given weight-loss advice and then split into two groups: one drank 16oz (500ml) half an hour before their meal, while the rest had to imagine they were full before their meals.

Those who drank lots of water lost around three pounds more than those who didn't.

“If you look at any sort of weight management programs, they all say drinking lots of water is a really good thing,” study author Dr. Amanda Daley of the University of Birmingham in the UK said. “We said, let’s go see what the actual evidence is for this.

“We all get fatter over time, so it might well work as a prevention strategy at a population level. We want people to drink more water anyway.”

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