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Natural birth possible post C-Section

HealthBy Sunday World
Natural birth possible post C-Section

For years women have been told that if they have a caesarean birth, any subsequent children will have to be delivered the same way. But a new report is disputing the theory, saying that a natural birth can take place even if a woman had a C-Section in the past.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined information from birth certificates from 41 US states in 2013, which accounted for 90 per cent of all births in the United States that year.

While the majority of women continued to have a caesarean birth following an initial C-section, 20 per cent attempted to give birth naturally, of which 70 per cent had a successful vaginal birth. However, the remaining 30 per cent required an emergency C-Section.

Traditionally, once a woman has given birth by caesarean, she will undergo the procedure for subsequent children. This is because of the risks associated with an emergency C-section if a vaginal delivery goes wrong, such as rupturing of the uterus.

However, the study found that those females who had a successful natural birth after an initial C-section labour were less likely to require blood transfusions, unplanned hysterectomies or admission to intensive care units.

The report, authored by Sally Curtin, of the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, stated: “Women with a previous Caesarean delivery who laboured and had vaginal birth generally had lower rates for most morbidities.

“Given the lower morbidity for vaginal compared with Caesarean deliveries, attempting a trial of labour is recommended for most women with no previous Caesarean as well as for low-risk women with a previous Caesarean delivery.”

However the experts did add that there are still risks involved and are heightened among those women who go on to need emergency Caesareans. In this instance, the rate of uterus rupture was found to be seven times higher than those who had a planned C-section.

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