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How to stay healthy while travelling

How to stay healthy while travelling

While most of us love a relaxing holiday or travel abroad, one of the downsides to racking up those frequent flier miles is that it is harder to sustain healthy habits.

With routine abandoned, food in abundance and less access to the gym, the motivation to pound the pavement and burn off those extra calories typically goes out the window.

But with the summer travel season just around the corner, we've compiled some top tips to staying healthy while travelling.

Avoid mindless eating on the plane

When travelling on long-haul flights it's pretty easy to fall into the trap of mindlessly eating what is put in front of you, with food becoming a time occupier. In a blog post, nutritional biochemist and author Dr Libby Weaver encourages people to simply eat when they are hungry and not feel bad about turning down meals when offered by flight staff. She also advises people avoid coffee and alcohol, as these can dehydrate you further. Another good way to prioritise your diet is to pack your snacks ahead of time. While it may take a bit of extra planning, not only will you feel better when you land, you'll avoid shelling out on bland airport meals.

Drink vegetable juices or smoothies

As soon as you land, grab a fresh vegetable juice to top your body up with added nutrition. If vegetable juice isn't on offer, look for a fruit juice or smoothie which is high in vitamin C or citrus fruits, in order to support your immune system after draining air-conditioned flights. Food blogger Ella Woodward also recommends packing a travel blender when going on a trip so you can pick up local fruits and nuts, as well as some spinach and whizz up a quick smoothie each morning. It's also a good idea to travel with a vitamin C supplement for a further boost.

Go for walks

When flying or on train journeys, it is import to move whenever possible, and simply walking up and down the aisles should do the trick. While sitting make sure you flex your ankles at regular intervals and moves your legs to keep the blood flowing. When you reach your destination, drop your bags and go for a quick tour around the town - this has the dual benefit of acclimatising you to your surroundings and is a great way to incorporate movement.

Rest when you need it

While it is important to move and stay active when travelling long distances, rest is also vital. Dr Weaver suggests scheduling rest periods into your date, especially when on business trips, just as you would arrange any other appointment. Accordingly, when you get busy, you'll always have that reminder when it is time for a break.

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