Style & ShowbizHealth

Excessive sweating tackled with a new patch

HealthBy Sunday World
Excessive sweating tackled with a new patch

A new treatment called miraSmooth is currently sweeping the US to help battle the dreaded sweat patch. While rings under our arms are acceptable in the gym, sweat staining a shirt during our commute to work is far from ideal. And it's not just us that fall foul; A-listers like Gwyneth Paltrow, Halle Berry and Cameron Diaz have all sported sweat patches on the red carpet. Hurrah, they are normal, sweaty humans too!

Previously Botox has been used to tackle sweaty underarms and even palms, but miraSmooth is the new kid on the block. It works by emitting microwaves, which focus directly on the hair follicle or sweat gland, and while the US's FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has given it the stamp of approval, no real research has been carried out on the long-term effects.

"Whilst a ‘quick fix’ treatment like this may be tempting, I would be extremely cautious about recommending that anyone take this course of action," Theresa Pope, Founder of Dandi Patch, told Cover Media.

“I can understand the frustration and embarrassment caused by excessive perspiration or unwanted hair, however as there have been no studies looking at the long-term effects of this type of treatment, I would definitely think twice before going ahead. I also find it difficult to trust any treatment that offers to ‘permanently’ change the way your body functions like this one does; there are plenty of other solutions on the market that are proven to be safe to use and so I would urge the public to do their research before signing up!”

To try and combat the problem, Theresa created the Dandi Patch (; an underarm perspiration shield that has been clinically designed as a discrete yet effective solution to excessive underarm sweat and absorbs up to 2000 times the amount of sweat the average female body produces daily.

It's estimated that as many as one in two people suffer from excessive sweating, with females aged between 18 and 34 particularly affected. 80 per cent of those who suffer admit they are embarrassed when meeting new people, with some even feeling depressed about the problem. If this sounds like you, don't sweat in silence - get ready to proudly wave your hands in the air like you just don't care and show off those dry underarms.

Cover Media