Style & ShowbizHealth

Boost your mood with food

HealthBy Sunday World
Boost your mood with food

We're all guilty of putting the kettle on, cutting a big slice of cake and just generally enjoying life. And while you may feel good at that exact moment, cake isn't what nutritionists would call good mood food.

So to help you in your quest to consume meals that do actually make you feel great NHS nutritionist Dr Sarah Schenker and food psychologist Dr Christy Fergusson have joined forces with Tilda to compile a list of the comfort foods we should all be eating. From appetite controllers, to foods that reduce cravings for sugary and fatty snacks, read on to see what you should be chowing down on.

Their list of 22 top foods include all the usual suspects such as pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, salmon, spinach, broccoli and quinoa.

Hero foods like coconut, avocado, pomegranates, blueberries and brazil nuts also made the cut.

“Brazil nuts are the richest source of the mineral selenium, containing ten times more than the next richest source. Selenium-rich food helps to combat depression and studies have shown that eating a small handful of Brazil nuts everyday can help to improve mood," Dr Schenker said.

Chickpeas, asparagus, beans and bananas also featured. And if you have a sweet tooth, fear not as dark chocolate is another great choice.

Ginger, beetroot, chilli, yoghurt, chicken and turkey and wholegrain Basmati are the last seven suggestions.

"Wholegrain Basmati is a great addition to the diet. Fluctuations in blood sugar levels are associated with changes in mood and energy, in turn blood sugar levels are affected by what we eat and drink," Dr Schenker noted. "After eating sugary foods or refined carbohydrates, your blood sugar levels can rise rapidly which may cause feelings of stress and anxiety, only to crash soon after, which can then leave you feeling lethargic or in low spirits. Low GI foods such as wholegrain Basmati rice contain the type of carbohydrate that releases energy slowly, keeping your blood sugar levels steady and maintaining a more balanced, calm mood."

Cover Media