Style & ShowbizHealth

Babies who drink cow's milk could become obese

HealthBy Sunday World
Babies who drink cow's milk could become obese

Babies who drink cow's milk instead of breast milk or formula before they turn one may be more at risk of being overweight or obese, new research has discovered. A study of over 1,000 children found a link between the type and quantity of milk and how they grew.

Between the ages of one and 10, the kids' weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were measured. Infants who drank the daily recommendation (600ml) or more of cow's milk at eight months old put on weight quicker than those who consumed breast milk, with the weight difference lasting up until the children were 10.

Meanwhile kids having the same amount of formula milk on a daily basis got bigger in infancy and came in heavier than those breast-fed until they were around two-and-a-half years old. Of those studied, 13.2 per cent received cow's milk at eight months, while 12.7 per cent were breast-fed and 74.1 per cent only had formula.

Dr Pauline Emmett, from the University of Bristol, has pointed out how important the findings, which have been published in the American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, are. "This could contribute to the development of childhood obesity and the health risks connected with that, which can persist right through to adulthood," she explained.

"Parents need to be advised about reducing the volume of milk fed by bottle once infants are established on solid foods."

Guidelines recommend parents avoid giving their little ones cow's milk as their main drink before they reach a year old. When looking after a child, one must be careful about their intake of milk/food. It should be noted that while babies can typically start solids around six months in, at this stage the most important thing is milk. And as tots get older, parents should avoid using milk or food as a soother when they're restless, as they may not be hungry.

Cover Media