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Vivienne Westwood adds husband's name to label

FashionBy Sunday World
Vivienne Westwood adds husband's name to label

Vivienne Westwood has added her husband Andreas Kronthaler's name to the label of her main runway collection.

The range, which will be shown at Paris Fashion Week next month (Mar16), was formerly known as Vivienne Westwood Gold Label but will be called Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood from the Autumn/Winter 16 line.

Andreas is Vivienne's long-time design partner and also her real-life spouse.

"Over the years, Andreas has taken on ever-more responsibility, and I wish this fact to be reflected in public perception," Vivienne said.

The change is just one of the alterations the label is making. While the two main lines will be Vivienne Westwood and Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood, the Anglomania and accessories collections will also continue but the brand's Red Label will no longer be a standalone line and will instead feature as part of the Vivienne Westwood collection.

"Over the years, we had added all these different lines. There was red carpet, denim, Anglomania and Worlds End. It just became confusing - even to ourselves. So we decided to take this step, and it seemed a very natural one," Andreas said, according to Women's Wear Daily.

"The messaging is clearer, you are in control and more directly in contact with the consumer. Nowadays, the most perfect thing would be to have only one line. As long as you have a collection that is well structured, that’s all you need. It’s about selling things you love. If you bring this all back in-house, you can do that," he said.

The debate currently hottest in the fashion industry is whether or not designers should show seasonless fashion in order to attract more consumers. Tom Ford and Burberry are among the names who have decided to showcase eternally stylish ranges rather than concentrating on Spring/Summer or Autumn/Winter lines, and Andreas thinks Vivienne Westwood may well fellow suit.

“I think we are all thinking about it - and how you organise, finance and promote it. It gets you closer to the natural way of buying clothes," he said. "I always found it very strange to bring somebody a winter coat in the heat of summer, and if you want a bathing suit for a holiday there aren’t any more in the shop. I also think it’s important that people question what they consume and whether they really need it.

"Things are in motion, and that’s what exciting and what keeps fashion alive. We don’t know where it’s all going. I think now, because the ice is broken, anything and everything is possible - and that’s what is so exciting."

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