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Raf Simons says a career in the fashion industry was 'completely alien' to him

Raf Simons says a career in the fashion industry was 'completely alien' to him

Raf Simons says a career in the fashion industry was "completely alien" to him when he was younger.

The 49-year-old fashion designer - who is the Chief Creative Officer of Calvin Klein - has admitted he grew up being advised he should become a doctor or a lawyer when he was younger because he wasn't aware of any other career paths.

Speaking to VanityFair.com about his upbringing, the creative mastermind said: "[I lived in] a village. There was nothing -- no boutique, no gallery, no cinema.

"You were supposed to become doctors or lawyers. For me, it was completely alien."

And it wasn't until the mogul started watching 'Style with Elsa Klensch' he became aware of a potential future in the fashion business.

He explained: "I was hooked on her program because it had international fashion designers -- Montana, Mugler, and then the Japanese. I didn't know you could study fashion. I also did not know you could study painting or sculpture. Nobody ever told me. My mom and dad, they were completely in another world."

And in 1995 Raf launched his eponymous menswear label, but he has "always" kept himself busy by dabbling in more than one project.

He said: "I don't know why, but I always need to do two things."

Raf has previously worked as the creative director at Christian Dior, and he has admitted he would never have taken over the design process for a fashion house if the brand didn't already have a "major legacy".

Speaking about his career choices, he said: "There is always a legacy. I could not go to a house that did not have a major legacy. Why would I?"

Meanwhile, Raf has revealed he gets the "biggest satisfaction" from seeing people, whether it is celebrities or not, adorning his designs.

He said: "The biggest satisfaction for any designer should be is if I see somebody in my clothes--whoever it is. It could be some kid in the street. It's very inspiring, because it's often not the way you saw it yourself. It re-activates your own process of thinking about how to dress people. For me, it's extremely relevant that fashion work in its moment in time. I'm not romantic about the past. Once it's done it's done. I'm romantic about the future."