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Nicole Richie's 'personal' pop-up store

FashionBy Sunday World
Nicole Richie's 'personal' pop-up store

Nicole Richie's new pop-up shop reflects her personality.

The 'Candidly Nicole' star has revealed she designed the store - which is housed in L.A's The Grove mall and sells everything from apparel and furniture to juice drinks - to not only embody her House of Harlow 1960 brand but also to reflect her own personal taste.

She explained: "[The products] are from my favourite places here in L.A. When I was going to open the store, I was like, I don't want this store to only reflect the brand, but also reflect me.

"The way it came together was really cool because just over the past few months, it's given me the opportunity to use this blank canvas to really represent what the brand is, and it's just been so exciting and an exciting journey for me, too."

The 33-year-old star's pop-up store collection retails between $24 to $395 and also includes a new summer clothing capsule range featuring kimonos and camisoles.

She will also sell her new jewellery collection in the store including a range of exclusive pieces she had previously just been making for her close pals.

She explained: "I've been making them for my friends, but I've never sold them before."

Nicole added she is thrilled with the way the store's quirky interior has turned out and credits designer Marsha Gordon for perfecting the "bohemian and colourful" vibe.

She told PEOPLE: "Her look to me is very bohemian, fun, colorful, and so I wanted to put pieces - furniture wise - that were eclectic.

"[With] the shelving, I wanted to add a rustic vibe to it because I feel like it's her bohemian style, and then I wanted to add a feminine touch."

Nicole previously confessed she wanted to bring a 60s and 70s feel to the store to encourage her customers to focus less on trends and more on styling the garments themselves.

She told WWD: "I'm going back to what the root of House of Harlow really was: the camisoles, kimono and slipdresses.

"[In the 60s and 70s] People were using music to express themselves and they were doing the same thing with fashion. There was very little focus on trends, and that's something that I want to bring back into fashion today. You don't have to wear [the pieces] the way I do. They're meant to be mixed with other items in your closet."