Style & ShowbizFashion

Liu Wen’s boyish style

FashionBy Sunday World
Liu Wen’s boyish style

Model Liu Wen sees her style as “boyish” but with a fashionable edge.

The Chinese beauty is changing the face of the fashion industry by becoming the first woman of East Asian descent to walk in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show and the first spokesmodel of Asian descent for Estée Lauder. With a huge following on social media, her personal style is just as interesting to fans as what she wears on the catwalk and now 27-year-old Liu has opened up about her wardrobe choices.

“My personal style is very casual and comfortable, a little boyish but often with a fashionable edge,” she explained via obs/Efetur/SAWYER CHENG.

Liu headed to Shanghai recently where she celebrated her love of clothing by supporting new e-commerce site Stradivarius, part of Spanish textile group Inditex. It was a “magical” moment for Liu, who is pleased Chinese women are now able to access the Spanish pieces.

Especially for the busy lifestyles of people in Shanghai, she feels online shopping is a massive timesaver and is pleased that fashion has such a pick-and-mix vibe

“The extensive Stradivarius portfolio allows customers to create countless combinations,” she smiled. “The charm of the pieces is that you can’t say one is from the east or one from the west, it’s a Spanish label that has impressed in many countries. Fashion allows the world to grow together.”

And growing is exactly what Liu plans to keep doing. As a child she never thought she was beautiful, but her career has given her a lot of confidence, with 2010’s appointment as Estée Lauder’s spokesmodel as incredibly poignant.

“The moment was life-changing, to say the least,” she previously told vogue.com. “Overnight, the image of me as an independent, confident young woman was embraced as beautiful. And this development catalysed a change in my own beauty ideals. The stereotypes of Asian women as submissive and dainty were fading. Instead, my fellow Asian models and I were more often depicted as adventurous, assertive, career-oriented women who always did our best despite the challenges we faced overseas.

“We might or might not possess physical features that fit traditional Asian views of beauty, but the fact that we represented modern ideas, combining the best of multiple cultures, became far more important.”

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