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Emily Ratajkowski: 'My body made people uncomfortable'

FashionBy Sunday World
Emily Ratajkowski: 'My body made people uncomfortable'

Emily Ratajkowski believes her early puberty "confused" people, as she was a girl who looked like a woman.

The model and actress' striking looks and enviable figure have made her a global star, with modelling jobs for the likes of Marc Jacobs and CR Fashion Book as well as film roles in Gone Girl, Entourage and We Are Your Friends. It was the music video for Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines, in which she danced about topless, that made her famous. While she's confident enough to flaunt her body now, it took some time to get there, as she struggled when she hit puberty in her pre-teen years.

"I started to realise that I was being perceived differently," she told ES Magazine. "It was confusing. Basically it was more about the way that people had a problem with a girl looking like a woman because it confused them.

"It made them feel uncomfortable and I think there was a lot of guilt that they wanted to induce."

She's happy to pose in sexy photoshoots and express her femininity, but admits these jobs have held her back slightly when it comes to establishing herself as a serious actress. Much to her annoyance, Emily has noticed a link between a woman's behaviour and other people's perception of them.

"It’s an interesting paradox. If you’re a sexy actress it’s hard to get serious roles," she explained. "You get offered the same thing they’ve seen you in. People are like sheep and they’re like 'Oh, that’s what she does well'.

"What’s so dumb is that women are 50 per cent of the population and they want to spend money to see movies where they’re portrayed as three-dimensional characters."

Emily has her mother to thank for her bold approach to showing her sexuality, as she encouraged her daughter to never apologise or be embarrassed by her beauty. The 24-year-old points out that while not all ladies are comfortable labelling themselves a feminist, they are bound to want to be seen as equal to men.

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