News

Today to be the hottest day of the year so far

NewsBy Shuki Byrne
If there ever was a day for an ice cream...
If there ever was a day for an ice cream...

The mini heatwave embracing the UK and Ireland in its heat will today bless us with the hottest day of the year so far, it is expected.

Temperatures in Britain are expected to reach into the mid-30s today and tomorrow, making it warmer than Rio de Janeiro. 

Firms there are being urged to allow workers to wear casual clothes during this week's heatwave rather than stick to any strict dress code - that's how hot it's going to be. 

The heatwave is being caused by a warm front and tropical continental air mass from Europe pushing across the country, bringing high temperatures and humidity.

That means Ireland will be receiving some high temperatures in the coming days. 

Met Eireann are expecting warm, sunny weather in mainly central and eastern regions, with temperatures expected to reach into the mid-20s.

This will make today the hottest day of the year so far as temperatures will reach 25C in places.

The eastern region of the country will receive the hottest weather, with temperatures in Dublin to remain high for the whole day. 

Tomorrow is going to be another scorcher, with temperatures again to reach into the mid-20s. However, there will be a higher threat of thundery showers. 

In the UK, a health warning has been issued amid concerns that lives could be at risk.

Vulnerable groups including the elderly, young children and people with breathing difficulties have been urged to stay cool as the hot weather pushes across the UK from Europe.

Dr Angie Bone at Public Health England said there could be more deaths than usual.

She said it seemed "likely" that the Met Office would issue a level 3 heatwave alert - which requires community support for at-risk groups, media alerts about keeping cool and a review of safety at public events. She added: "It is possible that we will see an excess mortality but it is too early to tell.

"We know that high temperatures do have an impact on health, particularly on older people and young children and people with chronic diseases."