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Paris terror attacks - what we know so far

NewsBy Kevin Palmer
Horrifying scenes on the streets of Paris
Horrifying scenes on the streets of Paris

The Paris terror attacks on Friday night have claimed the lives of as many as 140 people, with the French capital rocked by a series of strikes that have left a trail of carnage.

The death toll from attacks that are believed to have included suicide bombs is expected to rise, with the chain of events sparking a wave of fear throughout France.

Here are the key points of what we know at this stage of this horrific story:

France president Francois Hollande has declared a state of emergency and closed its borders after dozens of people were killed in violence in Paris.

* At least 100 people have been killed inside a Paris theatre. Reports suggest the attackers had tossed explosives at their hostages.

* Officials said shots were fired in at least two restaurants and at least two explosions were heard near the Stade de France stadium, where the national side was playing Germany in a friendly football match.

* At least six locations in Paris have been the subject of police operations amid the night of terror.

One of the bombs went off during the France v Germany soccer match, with this video capturing the moment when terror struck:

US President Barack Obama summed up the mood of a stunned world watching the Paris attacks unfold on TV, as he offered up this emotional response to the events:

Obama was joined by the world's leaders in condemning the attacks and showing solidarity with the French people:

German chancellor Angela Merkel is "deeply shocked" by the attacks, and has conveyed her sympathy and solidarity, the German foreign office said.

A spokesman for United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said: "The Secretary-General condemns the despicable terrorist attacks carried out today in various locations in and around Paris.

"The Secretary-General extends his deepest condolences to the families of the victims and wishes a speedy recovery to those injured. He stands with the government and people of France."