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'We will take no more' Dubliner makes powerful plea to killer gangs

Crime DeskBy Sunday World
Trevor O'Neill
Trevor O'Neill

A concerned Dubliner has written a passionate letter to the Sunday World pleading for the Kinahan gang to end their bloody war on the Hutch family.

The writer, who wished to remain anonymous, describes themselves as a resident of Dublin 12, a stronghold of the likes of Liam Byrne, whose brother David was shot dead at the Regency Hotel earlier this year.

And they plead with the murderous mob to 'end this, end it now because there are more of us ordinary decent people than there are of you'.  

The killing of David Byrne escalated a simmering feud between the Hutch family and the Kinahan cartel that has since claimed a number of lives, most recently Trevor O’Neill, an innocent father of three who was gunned down on holiday in Majorca on Wednesday night.

O'Neill was from Drimnagh, the same area of Dublin as Byrne, and his brutal killing in front of his wife and children sparked one concerned Dubliner to send us a powerful message directed at the lethal gangs that hail from the area.

'We all know you, we've grown up in fear of your name, in awe of your money and power. Drugs ruined us in the 80s and we ran the dealers out. You did your business quietly and to our eternal fault we let you.

'When David was killed, we for the most part understood, he was family and it was wrong. But a line has been crossed, we are human, we are decent and we care for our own.  

'Perhaps this is why we indulged your grief for David, but now we grieve. We grieve for Trevor O'Neill. We grieve for his partner Suzanne. We grieve for his children. We grieve for a time when we could innocently talk to another Irishman abroad without fear his surname was a death sentence.

'While Trevor may not have been the intended target, if we consider the person who was, what was his crime?  Being a Hutch? Having the wrong surname? Well his partner and his children, they're ours too so hands (guns) off.

'We tell you now that we will take no more. Trevor more than being one of us was all of us. The average man who worked hard and loved his family. He was good, he was funny, he was kind and in ending his life you ended our tolerance. End this, end it now because there are more of us ordinary decent people than there are of you.  

'We are your neighbours, we are the parents at the school gates, we have no faces but we know yours and we want peace.

'Trust us,you do too.'

It is a powerful message, moving and passionate. The only question now is will the violent thugs responsible for so much misery pay any heed to the wishes of the local community?