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Iconic Clerys sign feared stolen

Iconic Clerys sign feared stolen

An iconic Clerys sign worth up to €3,000 is feared stolen after it went missing from the walls of the historic department store.

The valuable bronze crest, which is believed to have been pinned to the wall of the building since it opened in 1853, has been missing for a number of months.

It is one of a number of metal plaques on the walls of the old department store which are protected structures, according to Dublin City Council.

The local authority says it was taken down without its permission. A spokeswoman for DCC said it had received a complaint and was investigating.

"The crest was not removed by Dublin City Council," she said.

"As this is a protected structure the crest should not have been removed without permission or at least a Section 5 Declaration.

"Dublin City Council Planning Enforcement have received a complaint and the matter will be investigated."

Ian Whyte of Whyte's auctioneers on Molesworth Street, told the Herald that an item such as this crest could be sold for up to €3,000.

"If it was on a legitimate market and the owners of the building were selling it, it might be worth as much as €2,000-€3,000," Mr Whyte said.

"The Clerys one would be more manageable and is quite a nice size for someone to display.

"Some of it is melted down I'm afraid. If it's made of bronze it could be worth a few bob," he added.

Mr Whyte said his auctioneers sold a number of items from Clerys at an auction in September, which commanded quite high prices.

"We had the old doorman's cap and that went for around €200 and we had a presentation key which was given to Denis Guiney on his 21st anniversary of buying the place in 1961 - that made €580," he said.

Another crest, similar to the one that is missing, appears to have all of its main bolts removed and city councillor, Mannix Flynn fears that more of these signs will be stolen.

He added that Clerys is just one of a number of parts of the city that are being targeted by thieves.

"Someone will come along and just jemmy that off and I want to save that one," Mr Flynn said.

"There's a pool of people going around stealing these things. These are invaluable and these are part of our heritage and history, it's not good enough that these aren't protected.

"I think that when a building is unoccupied these items should be taken in and restored," he added.

Building owner, OCS Properties, was contacted by the Herald but had not responded at the time of going to print, though it has no involvement in the disappearance of the Clerys sign.