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Wife admits Christmas Day attempt to poison husband with anti-freeze

Crime WorldBy Sunday World
Jacqueline Patrick (Pic credit: Met Police)
Jacqueline Patrick (Pic credit: Met Police)

A woman has admitted trying to kill her pensioner husband by spiking a Christmas Day cherry Lambrini with anti-freeze.

Jacqueline Patrick, 54, poisoned spouse Douglas Patrick's drink on December 25, 2013, after a row, Scotland Yard said.

The 70-year-old man was left fighting for his life after being rushed to hospital on St Stephen's Day from the family home in Gypsy Hill, south London.

The Metropolitan Police said she even gave London ambulance staff a fake "do not resuscitate" note she claimed was from her husband on the way to Accident and Emergency.

The note contained the word dignity spelled 'dignaty' and when police asked her to spell the word she spelled it in the same incorrect way as the note.

He had already survived an attempt by his wife to poison him the previous October, detectives later discovered.

Jacqueline Patrick pleaded guilty on Thursday to two counts of attempted murder at Inner London Crown Court, officials confirmed.

Their daughter, Katherine Patrick, 21, admitted a charge of inciting another to administer a noxious substance.

Metropolitan Police Detective Inspector Tracey Miller said it had been a "calculated and well-planned plot".

DI Miller said: "At a time when a family should be celebrating the festive season, Patrick was plotting how to get rid of her husband once and for all, aided by her daughter.

"Motivated, it is thought, by family tension and arguments between herself and her husband and the victim and their daughters, she spiked his Christmas Day drink with anti-freeze.

"Mr Patrick came very close to dying and while he lay in his hospital bed fighting for his life, his wife told lie after lie to cover her tracks. Perhaps most shocking of all was the note she gave to the London Ambulance Service purporting to be from her husband, stating that he did not wish to be resuscitated."

Detectives said they were called by staff at King's College Hospital after Mr Patrick was admitted and placed in an induced coma following his collapse at home in Durning Road.

Tests revealed anti-freeze poisoning and when Jacqueline Patrick told hospital staff he may have drunk a blue liquid by mistake they became suspicious she had not mentioned it earlier and alerted police.

When Mr Patrick came round on January 8, 2014, he told police he had suffered a similar collapse the previous October, which he had put down to drinking "bootleg lager", police said.

The two women were arrested and Jacqueline admitted spiking his cherry Lambrini. Text messages showing three separate plots to poison Mr Patrick between October and December were found, detectives said.

The two women, both of Durning Road, Gypsy Hill, will be sentenced at Inner London Crown Court on November 2.